Plasma Processes and Polymers

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 6

Special Issue: Plasma Sterilisation and Decontamination

June 2012

Volume 9, Issue 6

Pages 555–629

Issue edited by: Michael Kong, Mounir Laroussi, Michel Moisan, François Rossi

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Full Papers
    7. Retraction
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 6/2012

      Simon Schneider, Jan-Wilm Lackmann, Dirk Ellerweg, Benjamin Denis, Franz Narberhaus, Julia E. Bandow and Jan Benedikt

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover: The image shows a modified version of a micro scale He/O2 atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ) source. The so-called X-Jet allows separation of gaseous particles from photons in the effluent downstream of the plasma. The separation is realized in the crossed-channel structure at the nozzle of the jet, where a direct channel (extension of the space between electrodes, where the plasma is located) is crossed by an additional side channel. A helium flow introduced through the side channel of this structure deflects all particles in the plasma effluent into the side channel. The photons, in contrast, are not affected by this additional gas flow and they can propagate undisturbed through the direct channel, which is filled by helium gas. The isolated effect of plasma generated photons or reactive radicals on any substrate placed under the channels can be examined in this way. Moreover, photochemistry reactions initiated by plasma generated photons with the gas mixture in the side channel can also be tested. Further details can be found in the article by S. Benedikt on page 561.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Full Papers
    7. Retraction
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 6/2012

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290017

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Full Papers
    7. Retraction
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 6/2012 (pages 555–558)

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290015

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Full Papers
    7. Retraction
    1. Special Issue on Plasma Sterilization and Decontamination (pages 559–560)

      François Rossi, Michel Moisan, Michael Kong and Mounir Laroussi

      Article first published online: 26 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200034

  5. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Full Papers
    7. Retraction
    1. The Role of VUV Radiation in the Inactivation of Bacteria with an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (pages 561–568)

      Simon Schneider, Jan-Wilm Lackmann, Dirk Ellerweg, Benjamin Denis, Franz Narberhaus, Julia E. Bandow and Jan Benedikt

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100102

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The role of VUV photons in the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of bacteria is investigated with the help of a modified He/O2 atmospheric pressure plasma jet, which allows effective separation of reactive particles from the plasma-generated photons. We demonstrate that the impact of photochemistry products on bacteria is more effective than inactivation by radiation damage.

    2. Decontamination of Microbiologically Contaminated Specimen by Direct and Indirect Plasma Treatment (pages 569–575)

      Uta Schnabel, Rijana Niquet, Udo Krohmann, Jörn Winter, Oliver Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Jörg Ehlbeck

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100088

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The antimicrobial efficacy of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and a microwave plasma setup against Bacillus atrophaeus spores on biological and non-biological surfaces is investigated. Moreover, the establishment of a non-biological specimen for the comparability of different plasma techniques is shown. The decontamination efficiency raised up to 5.2 log cfu/specimen by plasma treatment.

    3. Biological Decontamination Using High and Reduced Pressure Nitrogen Afterglows (pages 576–584)

      Jean-Philippe Sarrette, Sarah Cousty, Franck Clement, Cristina Canal and André Ricard

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100096

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Variation of the N-atom transmission TN through the PP-3 and PP-1 polypropylene membranes with the N2 flow rate QN2. The indicated pressure is the pressure in the reactor (PMW = 100 W).

    4. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Surface Disinfection (pages 585–589)

      Yang-Fang Li, Tetsuji Shimizu, Julia L. Zimmermann and Gregor E. Morfill

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100090

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The self-sterilizing surface works in a way that the target surface itself can be disinfected by cold atmospheric plasma generated on the surface and by the encapsulated electrical electrodes. This technology can apply to any surfaces with complex structures. Different from most of the bacterial experiments in literatures, we tested the bactericidal effect by cold atmospheric plasma directly on the electrode surface.

    5. Sterilization Method for Medical Container Using Microwave-Excited Volume-Wave Plasma (pages 590–596)

      Masaaki Nagatsu, Ying Zhao, Iuliana Motrescu, Ryota Mizutani, Yuya Fujioka and Akihisa Ogino

      Article first published online: 5 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100111

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The present experimental results demonstrate rapid (<40 min) sterilization of the interior of a medical container by a microwave-excited volume-wave plasma at a relatively low temperature (<100°C).

    6. Complex Responses of Microorganisms as a Community to a Flowing Atmospheric Plasma (pages 597–611)

      Danny L. Bayliss, James L. Walsh, Felipe Iza, Gilbert Shama, John Holah and Michael G. Kong

      Article first published online: 20 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100104

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Upon the influence of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume, a community of Listeria innocua with initially uniform surface deposition is shown to undergo complex adaptation steps, starting with the emergence of discrete isles of cell aggregates, through their evolution into “cell refuges” that protect viable cells from subsequent plasma treatment and finally, the disintegration of the cell refuges leaving only a thin layer of fragmented cell debris.

    7. Decontamination of Prions by the Flowing Afterglow of a Reduced-pressure N2[BOND]O2 Cold-plasma (pages 612–618)

      Benaïssa Elmoualij, Olivier Thellin, Stéphanie Gofflot, Ernst Heinen, Pierre Levif, Jacynthe Séguin, Michel Moisan, Annie Leduc, Jean Barbeau and Willy Zorzi

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100194

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, also called prion diseases, represent a family of neurodegenerative disorders. Since the infectious forms of prions are transmissible and highly resistant to decontamination methods, they represent a challenge for science, medicine, and public health/food systems. Suitable decontamination procedures are generally incompatible with the materials from which medical devices are made. We show that the N2O2 discharge afterglow reduces the immunoreactivity of both non-infectious recombinant and pathogenic prion proteins deposited on polystyrene substrates, and achieves significant decontamination of stainless steel sutures inoculated with infectious forms of prions.

    8. Plasma Sterilization of Pharmaceutical Products: From Basics to Production (pages 619–629)

      Benjamin Denis, Simon Steves, Egmont Semmler, Nikita Bibinov, Wenzel Novak and Peter Awakowicz

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100211

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The pharmaceutical regulatory agencies request a decontamination step before any material enters a closed aseptic production environment. The first commercial plasma sterilization system integrated in a pharmaceutical filling line is presented. It is approved by the agencies. The design of an industry scale plasma sterilization reactor is illustrated based on a laboratory plasma reactor.

  6. Retraction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Full Papers
    7. Retraction
    1. You have free access to this content
      Retraction: Plasma Acid: Water Treated by Dielectric Barrier Discharge

      Natalie Shainsky, Danil Dobrynin, Utku Ercan, Suresh G. Joshi, Haifeng Ji, Ari Brooks, Gregory Fridman, Young Cho, Alexander Fridman and Gary Friedman

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100084

      This article corrects:

      Retraction: Plasma Acid: Water Treated by Dielectric Barrier Discharge

      Vol. 9, Issue 6, Article first published online: 2 MAR 2012

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