Plasma Processes and Polymers

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 7

July 2012

Volume 9, Issue 7

Pages 635–741

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 7/2012

      Zhiqiang Chen, Xiujuan J. Dai, Peter R. Lamb, David R. de Celis Leal, Bronwyn L. Fox, Ying Chen, Johan du Plessis, Matthew Field and Xungai Wang

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290019

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover: The cover shows indentation impressions by AFM for epoxy, MWCNT/epoxy, and plasma amine-functionalized MWCNT/epoxy composites. Further details can be found in the article by J. Dai on page 733.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 7/2012

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290020

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 7/2012 (pages 635–637)

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290018

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Full Papers
    1. Fabrication and Operation of a Microcavity Plasma Array Device for Microscale Surface Modification (pages 638–646)

      Sameer A. Al-Bataineh, Endre J. Szili, Philipp J. Gruner, Craig Priest, Hans J. Griesser, Nicolas H. Voelcker, Robert D. Short and David A. Steele

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100166

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      Maskless and non-contact microplasma patterning of materials surfaces has been developed. Patterned surfaces can be fabricated quickly at relatively low cost. Micropatterned surfaces were characterised utilising XPS and ToF-SIMS imaging and small-spot analysis. This method enabled the fabrication of low-density microarrays with high fidelity in feature size and resolution.

    2. Deposition of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon Nitride Films with a Dielectric Barrier Discharge (pages 647–651)

      Ulrike Martens, H. C. Thejaswini, Abhijit Majumdar and Rainer Hippler

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100185

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      Thin amorphous carbon nitride films have been deposited with a dielectric barrier discharge plasma. The experiments were performed with C2H6/N2 gas ratios between 1:1 and 1:5 and at gas pressures of 300 mbar and 500 mbar. The chemical composition of deposited films depends on the working gas composition. Films deposited with higher nitrogen gas concentrations show a larger N/C ratio, an increase of C=N and C≡N bonds, and become harder.

    3. The Effect of O2 in a Humid O2/N2/NOx Gas Mixture on NOx and N2O Remediation by an Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge (pages 652–689)

      Steluta Teodoru, Yukihiro Kusano and Annemie Bogaerts

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100187

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      A non-thermal plasma technology was applied to analyse the optimum remediation conditions of different nitrogen oxides NxOy emitted from mobile sources (e.g. diesel engines). The transient glow phase of a micro-discharge in a dielectric barrier discharge was simulated for one pulse and afterglow and multi-pulse regime. The aim was to investigate the influence of O2 content in a humid O2/N2 gas mixture on the NO, NO2 and N2O removal, assuming initial pollutant concentrations of 100 ppm NO and 1 ppm NO2. The case without O2 in the feedstock gas revealed the lowest by-product concentrations for a NO removal efficiency of 100%.

    4. Hyperthermal Atomic Oxygen and Argon Modification of Polymer Surfaces Investigated by Molecular Dynamics Simulations (pages 690–700)

      Travis W. Kemper and Susan B. Sinnott

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100197

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      Atomic scale molecular dynamics simulations are conducted of hyperthermal modification of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene surfaces by argon and atomic oxygen. The forces are calculated with the second-generation reactive empirical bond-order potential with modified parameters for C, H, O interactions. The difference in surface modification between reactive and unreactive particles is discussed in terms of etching and changes in coordination of the surface atoms.

    5. Synthesis of Polymer-like Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon by fs-pulsed Laser Induced Plasma Processing of Solid Hexane (pages 701–708)

      Michal J. Wesolowski, Brad Moores, Zoya Leonenko, Reza Karimi, Joseph H. Sanderson and Walter W. Duley

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100206

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      Evolution of the properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films, remaining after plasma processing of solid hexane by fs laser induced carbon plasma, as a function of processing time is presented. Polymer-like carbon films embedded with hexane molecules and having unique dendritic surface structure are the first products of this interaction. After increased processing time these films decompose into a material that is similar to low H amorphous carbon.

    6. Nanocomposite Thin Films with Hybrid Inorganic/Organic Matrix for the Modification of Silicon-Based Implants (pages 709–717)

      Jorge Nunes, Rita J. Santos, Vera Loureiro and Ana P. Piedade

      Article first published online: 27 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100089

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      Nanocomposites thin films with a hybrid inorganic/organic matrix for the modification of silicon neural implants were deposited by r.f. sputtering. The presence of hydrophilic domains on the surface was assessed by contact angle hysteresis which indicates promising results for their use as biomedical devices.

    7. Inspired Chemistry for a Simple but Highly Effective Immobilization of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor on Gallic Acid-functionalized Plasma Polymerized Film (pages 718–725)

      Zhilu Yang, Jing Wu, Xin Wang, Jin Wang and Nan Huang

      Article first published online: 11 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100199

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      A novel two-step approach to creating a functional plasma polymerized coating with abundant quinone groups for a facile and high effective immobilization of growth factors in chemical mild PBS solution is reported.

    8. DNA Damage in Mammalian Cells by Non-thermal Atmospheric Pressure Microsecond Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma is not Mediated by Ozone (pages 726–732)

      Sameer Kalghatgi, Alexander Fridman, Jane Azizkhan-Clifford and Gary Friedman

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100156

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      Neutral active species produced by non-thermal plasma have been shown to play an important role in the interaction of non-thermal plasma with living cells. Of all the neutral species DBD plasma produces copious amounts of ozone and hence is investigated as a possible candidate for the observed effects of plasma on mammalian cells. After thorough investigation it appears that ozone does not play a role in mediating the effects of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma.

    9. Practical Amine Functionalization of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Effective Interfacial Bonding (pages 733–741)

      Zhiqiang Chen, Xiujuan J. Dai, Peter R. Lamb, David R. de Celis Leal, Bronwyn L. Fox, Ying Chen, Johan du Plessis, Matthew Field and Xungai Wang

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100203

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      A continuous wave plasma followed by a pulsed plasma effectively functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The combined mode allowed the highest reported levels of primary amines and the replacement of ammonia with N2 plus H2. It also gave better results for plasma polymerization using the less toxic heptylamine. The resultant epoxy composites were harder (smaller indentations) even at 0.1 wt.-% loading.

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