Plasma Processes and Polymers

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 9

September 2012

Volume 9, Issue 9

Pages 835–936

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Debate - Discussions
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 9/2012

      Jin He and Yuantao T Zhang

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cover: The pie charts of the left side of this figure give the percentages of the main productive reactions for the atomic oxygen and SDO respectively; the right side show the simulated and inferred atomic oxygen density and SDO density versus the oxygen admixture, and the optimal oxygen admixtures of 0.6% and 0.3% can be observed in accordance with the simulation results, at which the peak atomic oxygen density and SDO density could be achieved, respectively. Further details can be found in the article by Y. T. Zhang on page 919.

  2. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Debate - Discussions
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 9/2012

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290026

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Debate - Discussions
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    1. Plasma Process. Polym. 9/2012 (pages 835–838)

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201290024

  4. Debate - Discussions

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Debate - Discussions
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    1. Comment on “Ion-Assisted Processes of Polymerization in Low-Pressure Plasmas” (pages 844–849)

      Riccardo d'Agostino and Fabio Palumbo

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200072

      Ions as building blocks in the deposition of plasma polymers, or as promoters and initiators of the polymerization process? Perchance the both, depending on the operative conditions.

  5. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Debate - Discussions
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    1. Insights into the Mechanisms of Isopropanol Conversion on γ-Al2O3 by Dielectric Barrier Discharge (pages 850–854)

      Mickaël Rivallan, Elodie Fourré, Sébastien Aiello, Jean-Michel Tatibouët and Frédéric Thibault-Starzyk

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200021

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalysis in-plasma. Isopropanol conversion on γ-Al2O3 by dielectric barrier discharge plasma proceeds via oxidation, aldolization and fragmentation mechanisms. Such cascade reactions are only possible when γ-Al2O3 catalyst is placed in the discharge zone. The present case of study clearly highlights the importance of the catalyst located in the plasma.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Masthead
    4. Contents
    5. Debate - Discussions
    6. Communication
    7. Full Papers
    1. Etching and Deposition Mechanism of an Alcohol Plasma on Polycarbonate and Poly(Methyl Methacrylate): An Adhesion Promotion Mechanism for Plasma Deposited a:SiOxCyHz Coating (pages 855–865)

      Colin J. Hall, Peter J. Murphy and Hans J. Griesser

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Alcohol plasma pre-treatments have been shown to both etch PC and deposit a thin plasma polymer layer. This dual mechanism has been shown to aid adhesion between the substrate and a subsequently deposited vacuum hardcoating. A similar result has been previously reported for PMMA, however treatment times for optimum adhesion to PC were significantly longer. A discussion on the relative etching mechanism and a model for the required longer treatment times is proposed.

    2. Plasma Directed Organization of Nanodots on Polymers: Effects of Polymer Type and Etching Time on Morphology and Order (pages 866–872)

      Dimitrios Kontziampasis, Vassilios Constantoudis and Evangelos Gogolides

      Version of Record online: 30 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100163

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Oxygen Plasma Etching of polymers led to organized nanodot formation on their surface. Nanodots were formed on different polymers (PMMA, PS, and PET) showing that the phenomenon is generic. Time evolution of surface morphology revealed the emergence of a second scale topography at longer etching times, associated with low frequency fluctuations.

    3. Plasma Processing: Technology for the Batch Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Film Electrodes for Biointerfaces (pages 873–883)

      Joon Hyub Kim, Myung Jin Lee, Eun Jin Park, Jun-Yong Lee, Cheol Jin Lee and Nam Ki Min

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100172

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      O2 plasma-patterned and -activated SWCNT films are fully integrated into miniaturized three-electrode systems on glass substrate for biosensor applications. Efficient biointerfaces between O2 plasma-processed SWCNT surfaces and biomolecules can be realized for the covalent immobilization of biorecognition molecules such as DNAs. The plasma processing technology for SWCNT electrode presented in this study can be applied to the fabrication of other SWCNT-based biosensors.

    4. UV Grafting of a Vinyl Monomer Onto a Methanol Plasma Polymer (pages 884–889)

      Benjamin W. Muir and Anna Tarasova

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this work a vinyl monomer has been photografted from the surface of a methanol plasma polymer without the use of a photoinitiator. The monomer graft polymer layer produced from PEGMA was characterized for its protein resistance and measured with AFM force curve analysis.

    5. Cost Effective Deposition System for Nitrogen Incorporated Diamond-like Carbon Coatings (pages 890–903)

      Sushil Kumar, Neeraj Dwivedi and Manas Kumar Dalai

      Version of Record online: 30 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100202

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Primary pump based cost effective RF-PECVD system is used for the deposition of mechanically hard and adhesive nitrogen incorporated diamond-like carbon (N-DLC) thin films. These inexpensive hard coatings (maximum hardness as 40.3 GPa) with other excellent mechanical properties deposited in a simple system may find their wide industrial applications as hard and protective coatings.

    6. Mass Spectrometric Investigations on Aluminum Isopropoxide Containing Plasmas (pages 904–910)

      Stefan Niemietz, Maik Fröhlich and Holger Kersten

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200012

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thin layers of alumina can be deposited by PECVD using the precursor aluminum isopropoxide (ATI). Mass spectrometric analyses are performed to investigate ATI containing rf-plasma regarding the fragmentation as well as polymerization processes taking place. The organometallic precursor is fragmented in the plasma and forms organoaluminum compounds besides occurring polymerization starting from hydrocarbon group, presumably, which is fragmented from ATI molecule.

    7. Introduction of Basic Functionalities on the Surface of Granular Adsorbers by Low Pressure Plasma Processes (pages 911–918)

      Nicoletta De Vietro, Riccardo d'Agostino and Francesco Fracassi

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201100176

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Low pressure plasmas can be utilized for surface modification of carbon black and sepiolite granules, in order to improve their adsorption properties for acids in gas or vapour phase. The adsorption improvement can be achieved grafting basic groups (i.e. NH2) on the surface of carbon black in NH3 containing discharges or by depositing thin films, containing basic functionalities, in allylamine fed plasmas on both carbon black and sepiolite. The experimental results show that the adsorption increase, induced by allylamine plasma treatment, is due to chemical effects and not to variations of the surface morphology. The absolute improvement is particularly evident for carbon black. Relative adsorbed equivalents % per gram of carbon black (A)/sepiolite (B) granules, untreated and coated with plasma deposited allylamine thin film.

    8. Modeling Study on the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Atmospheric Radio-Frequency Helium–Oxygen Discharges (pages 919–928)

      Jin He and Yuantao T Zhang

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200067

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in radio-frequency discharges at atmospheric pressure play an important role in plasma medicine. However, the interaction mechanism between the atmospheric plasma with ROS and living tissues is a far truly unsolved problem. An essential step to solve this problem is to fully understand the production and destruction of ROS. Computational simulation can give a more detailed description of the production and destruction of ROS. We explored a one-dimensional fluid model, incorporating 17 species and 65 key reactions, to investigate the generation mechanism of ROS in atmospheric He/O2 rf discharges.

    9. Side-on Surface Modification of Polystyrene with an Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma Jet (pages 929–936)

      Olumuyiwa T. Olabanji and James W. Bradley

      Version of Record online: 18 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppap.201200011

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Although plasma microjets are widely studied for the treatment of materials there is still a lack of understanding of the fundamental plasma-surface processes. A number of recent studies using plasma microjets for the surface modification have used systems in which the emerging plume impinges directly the substrate head-on. Here, by placing the microjet side-on to the substrate we can observe how different flow regions of the jet affect the sample. In addition, this configuration may prove an efficient way of treating samples with reduced or no surface damage.

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