Crystals: The Formation of Pd Nanocrystals from Pd2(dba)3 Microcrystals (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 3/2013)

Authors

  • Sungwook Chung,

    1. The Molecular Foundry and Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA
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  • Donovan N. Leonard,

    1. Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
    2. Evans Analytical Group, Raleigh, NC, USA
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  • Virginia Altoe,

    1. The Molecular Foundry and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA
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  • Shaul Aloni,

    1. The Molecular Foundry and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA
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  • James J. De Yoreo,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Molecular Foundry and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA
    • The Molecular Foundry and Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA
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  • Stefan Franzen

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
    • The Molecular Foundry and Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA
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Abstract

image

The image shows hexagonal Pd nanocrystals formed from hexagonal Pd2(dba)3 microcrystals. As-grown hexagonal platelets formed from a Pd2(dba)3 precursor are shown to be disordered microcrystals containing 1–2 nm Pd clusters, which grow and transform into Pd nanocrystals under an electron beam or through thermal annealing. In-depth investigation of the crystal structure and transformation process are presented by James J. De Yoreo, Stefan Franzen and co-workers on page 280.

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