Particle & Particle Systems Characterization

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 1

January, 2013

Volume 30, Issue 1

Pages 1–108

  1. Cover Picture

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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Review
    9. Progress Report
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
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    13. Communication
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      Microcarriers: Elaborate Design Strategies Toward Novel Microcarriers for Controlled Encapsulation and Release (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2013) (page 1)

      Tae Soup Shim, Shin-Hyun Kim and Seung-Man Yang

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201290027

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      Novel microcarriers for encapsulation of bioactive agents have been extensively investigated for therapeutic applications. Recent advances in microfluidics and other techniques have inspired the design of new microcarriers with precisely controlled size, shape, and function, which possibly allow for new medical and biological applications. Various types of novel microcarriers, including block-copolymer nanoparticles, cylindrical microparticles, dense-shell microcapsules, macroporous microcapsules, polymer vesicles, and foldable bilayer microparticles, are reviewed by Seung-Man Yang and co-workers on page 9.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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    9. Progress Report
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
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      Colloidal Nanoparticles: Formation of Large 2D Arrays of Shape-Controlled Colloidal Nanoparticles at Variable Interparticle Distances (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2013) (page 2)

      Simon Ullrich, Sebastian P. Scheeler, Claudia Pacholski, Joachim P. Spatz and Stefan Kudera

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201290028

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      Substrates with structures at the nanoscale are produced using a method presented by Stefan Kudera and co-workers on page 102. Colloidal nanocrystals are first synthesized in solution and then exposed to a ligand exchange. A monolayer of the particles covered with a thick layer of polystyrene is formed on the substrate. This results in a regular arrangement of the nanoparticles with tuneable interparticle distances. The method is accessible to different shapes and types of nanoparticles.

  3. Back Cover

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    11. Communications
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      Janus Particles: Metallic Janus and Patchy Particles (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2013) (page 110)

      Denis Rodríguez-Fernández and Luis M. Liz-Marzán

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201290029

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      The image shows an artist's view of different types of Janus and patchy particles, with different capping molecules, compositions, or morphologies at different parts of the particles. The partially immersed particles exemplify the preparation methods based on partial surface modification. A summary of the state of the art in the formation, properties, and applications of Janus and patchy particles containing a metallic component is presented by Denis Rodríguez-Fernández and Luis M. Liz-Marzán on page 46.

  4. Masthead

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    11. Communications
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      Masthead: (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2013)

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201290030

  5. Contents

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    11. Communications
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  6. Editorial

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    11. Communications
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      Particles Particles Everywhere (pages 7–8)

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201290023

  7. Review

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    11. Communications
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    1. Elaborate Design Strategies Toward Novel Microcarriers for Controlled Encapsulation and Release (pages 9–45)

      Tae Soup Shim, Shin-Hyun Kim and Seung-Man Yang

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200044

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      Novel microcarriers with advanced functionalities have been produced by using creative design strategies to encapsulate bioactive agents such as drugs and cells. The new synthetic routes to microcarriers enable precise control over the size, shape, and structure of particles, capsules, and foldable carriers and provide high efficiency of encapsulation, creating new opportunities for biological applications.

  8. Progress Report

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    9. Progress Report
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    11. Communications
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    1. Metallic Janus and Patchy Particles (pages 46–60)

      Denis Rodríguez-Fernández and Luis M. Liz-Marzán

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200057

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      A summary of the state of the art in the formation, properties, and applications of Janus and patchy particles containing a metallic component is presented. The general preparation methods are described, then the focus is directed to particles where surface segregation leads to multifunctional nanoparticles in which the main properties are determined by the metallic component.

  9. Frontispiece

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    11. Communications
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      Capsules: Thermo-Responsive Multi-Cargo Core Shell Particles (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2013) (page 61)

      Maxime Nollet, Martin Depardieu, Mathieu Destribats, Rénal Backov and Véronique Schmitt

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201290021

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      The synthesis of multi-compartment, thermally sensitive capsules is proposed using Pickering-based double emulsions and sol-gel chemistry. As reported by Rénal Backov, Véronique Schmitt, and co-workers on page 62, a limited-coalescence process allows the generation of sizecontrolled systems using a turbulent mixing device that makes an industrial transfer very easy. The release is provoked by an external thermal treatment, while the delivery temperature may be tuned for targeted application by the choice of the appropriate wax.

  10. Communications

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    1. Thermo-Responsive Multi-Cargo Core Shell Particles (pages 62–66)

      Maxime Nollet, Martin Depardieu, Mathieu Destribats, Rénal Backov and Véronique Schmitt

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200032

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      Combining formulation of particle-stabilized water-in-oil-in-water emulsion and in situ sol-gel chemistry, original monodisperse thermo-responsive capsules able to encapsulate at once hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs are synthesized. Due to the presence of a stiff shell, the release is provoked by increasing the temperature above the wax melting point. The solid-to-liquid transition induces a volume expansion responsible for the capsule rupture.

    2. One-Step Hydrothermal Synthesis of Ag Nanoparticle Decorated Submicrometer-Scale Spherical AgBr Colloids: A Highly Efficient Visible Light Plasmonic Photocatalyst for Degradation of Organic Dyes (pages 67–71)

      Wenbo Lu, Xiaoyun Qin, Haiyan Li, Abdullah M. Asiri, Abdulrahman O. Al-Youbi and Xuping Sun

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200033

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      Ag-AgBrCs are prepared by a novel one-step hydrothermal strategy. The resulting Ag-AgBrCs are prepared as a visible light plasmonic photocatalyst with high efficiency and for the degradation of organic dyes.

    3. Hybrid Particles of Polyethylene@silica as Precursors for Porous Polyethylene (pages 72–74)

      Hila Elimelech and David Avnir

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200038

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      Porous polyethylene is a key material with many applications. A new synthesis of it is described, based on full-IPN interpenetrating network (IPN) sub-micrometer hybrid particles of silica within which cross-linked polyethylene is entrapped.

  11. Frontispiece

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      Nanodrilling: Iron Particle Nanodrilling of Few Layer Graphene at Low Electron Beam Accelerating Voltages (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2013) (page 75)

      Jessica Campos-Delgado, Daniel L. Baptista, Miguel Fuentes-Cabrera, Bobby G. Sumpter, Vincent Meunier, Humberto Terrones, Yoong Ahm Kim, Hiroyuki Muramatsu, Takuya Hayashi, Morinobu Endo, Mauricio Terrones and Carlos A. Achete

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201290022

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      A snap shot from molecular dynamics calculations showing how an iron particle (pink) ingests carbon atoms (blue) from a graphene surface below is shown. The process results in the creation of holes in the graphene sheet and the formation of “holey graphene”. As reported by Mauricio Terrones and co-workers on page 76, the calculations explain how iron particles can catalyze the formation of holes in graphene by a low energy electron beam using an aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope.

  12. Communication

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    1. Iron Particle Nanodrilling of Few Layer Graphene at Low Electron Beam Accelerating Voltages (pages 76–82)

      Jessica Campos-Delgado, Daniel L. Baptista, Miguel Fuentes-Cabrera, Bobby G. Sumpter, Vincent Meunier, Humberto Terrones, Yoong Ahm Kim, Hiroyuki Muramatsu, Takuya Hayashi, Morinobu Endo, Mauricio Terrones and Carlos A. Achete

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200041

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      Atomic vacancies in graphene are created under relatively low energy electron bombardment, but the formation of vacancies is significanlty enhanced by iron nanocatalysis. The evolution of the overall process involves nanoparticle agglomeration, interlayer migration, and confinement to nearby defects. The catalytic activation of metal nanoparticles via elecron irradiation on graphene-like surfaces appears to be a novel process that can be used to obtain porous graphene sheets with high surface areas.

  13. Frontispiece

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      Electron Tomography: Quantitative Structure Determination of Large Three-Dimensional Nanoparticle Assemblies (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2013) (page 83)

      Thomas Altantzis, Bart Goris, Ana Sánchez-Iglesias, Marek Grzelczak, Luis M. Liz-Marzán and Sara Bals

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201290024

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      Electron tomography is an important tool to investigate nanoassemblies in three dimensions. As reported by Sara Bals and co-workers on page 84, the complete electron tomography approach is optimized to quantify the number of particles in the assembly. The image shows a 3D reconstruction of a spherical self-assembly of gold nanoparticles. The background consists of false-colored 2D projection images that are used for the reconstruction.

  14. Communication

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    1. Quantitative Structure Determination of Large Three-Dimensional Nanoparticle Assemblies (pages 84–88)

      Thomas Altantzis, Bart Goris, Ana Sánchez-Iglesias, Marek Grzelczak, Luis M. Liz-Marzán and Sara Bals

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200045

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      To investigate nanoassemblies in three dimensions, electron tomography is an important tool. For large nanoassemblies, it is not straightforward to obtain quantitative results in three dimensions. An optimized acquisition technique, incoherent bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy, is combined with an advanced 3D reconstruction algorithm. The approach is applied to quantitatively analyze large nanoassemblies in three dimensions.

  15. Frontispiece

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      Luminescence: Tunable Visible Emission of Luminescent Hybrid Nanoparticles Incorporating Two Complementary Luminophores: ZnO Nanocrystals and [Mo6Br14]2− Nanosized Cluster Units (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2013) (page 89)

      Tangi Aubert, Nicolas Nerambourg, Noriko Saito, Hajime Haneda, Naoki Ohashi, Michel Mortier, Stéphane Cordier and Fabien Grasset

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201290025

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      Functional silica nanoparticles are of particular interest in photonics and biotechnologies. On page 90, Tangi Aubert, Stéphane Cordier, Fabien Grasset, and co-workers report the synthesis of new luminescent ZnO-Cs2[Mo6Br14]@SiO2 nanoparticles. The co-encapsulation in a silica matrix of two complementary luminophores, ZnO nanocrystals and [Mo6Br14]2- cluster units, results in nanoparticles with tunable emission properties. Depending on the excitation wavelength, the nanoparticles show different colors of emission. If associated with a blue light-emitting diode (LED), the nanoparticles produce a very broad emission spectrum covering almost the entire the visible range, thus affording the emission of white light.

  16. Communication

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    1. Tunable Visible Emission of Luminescent Hybrid Nanoparticles Incorporating Two Complementary Luminophores: ZnO Nanocrystals and [Mo6Br14]2− Nanosized Cluster Units (pages 90–95)

      Tangi Aubert, Nicolas Nerambourg, Noriko Saito, Hajime Haneda, Naoki Ohashi, Michel Mortier, Stéphane Cordier and Fabien Grasset

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200047

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      ZnO nanocrystals and Mo6 clusters are embedded in silica nanoparticles using a modified Stöber process. The resulting materials offer tunable emission properties with a broad emission covering almost the entire visible range for an excitation wavelength of 365 nm. The luminescence properties of the nanoparticles remain stable even when the particles are dispersed in water.

  17. Frontispiece

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      Nanowire Networks: Chloride Anion Triggered Synthesis and Assembly of Gold Nanoparticle-Ultrathin Cadmium Selenide Nanowire Networks with Enhanced Photoconductivity (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2013) (page 96)

      Hong-Bin Yao, Ye Guan, Jing Zheng, Gang Huang, Jie Xu, Jian-Wei Liu, Huai-Ping Cong and Shu-Hong Yu

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201290026

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      A new type of Au nanoparticle-CdSe ultrathin nanowire network hybrid can be synthesized by chloride-aniontriggered oriented attachment and heterogeneous nucleation growth processes, as demonstrated by Shu-Hong Yu and co-workers on page 97. The efficient charge separation at the Au–CdSe hetero-nanostructure interface leads to an obvious enhancement in photoconductivity compared to a pure CdSe ultrathin nanowire network.

  18. Communication

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    1. Chloride Anion Triggered Synthesis and Assembly of Gold Nanoparticle-Ultrathin Cadmium Selenide Nanowire Networks with Enhanced Photoconductivity (pages 97–101)

      Hong-Bin Yao, Ye Guan, Jing Zheng, Gang Huang, Jie Xu, Jian-Wei Liu, Huai-Ping Cong and Shu-Hong Yu

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200059

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      Chloride anion triggered growth of Au nanoparticle-CdSe ultrathin nanowire network: A new kind of Au nanoparticle-CdSe ultrathin nanowire network hybrid can be synthesized via chloride anion triggered oriented attachment and heterogeneous nucleation growth processes. The efficient charge separation at the Au-CdSe hetero-nanostructure interface leads to an obvious enhancement of photoconductivity compared with a pure CdSe ultrathin nanowire network.

  19. Full Paper

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    1. Formation of Large 2D Arrays of Shape-Controlled Colloidal Nanoparticles at Variable Interparticle Distances (pages 102–108)

      Simon Ullrich, Sebastian P. Scheeler, Claudia Pacholski, Joachim P. Spatz and Stefan Kudera

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200065

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      A method for the production of homogeneous layers of nanoparticles of arbitrary shape is presented. The ligands are substituted by a functionalized polymer. The polymer-coated particles are deposited in a regular array on substrates. The interparticle distances in the layer can be adjusted by the length of the polymer. Regular arrangements of the nanoparticles covering areas of several square centimeters are achieved.

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