Particle & Particle Systems Characterization

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 4

April 2013

Volume 30, Issue 4

Pages 299–390

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      Drug Delivery: Multifunctional Polymer-Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Safe Drug Delivery (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 4/2013) (page 299)

      Thomas L. Moore, Joshua E. Pitzer, Ramakrishna Podila, Xiaojia Wang, Robert L. Lewis, Stuart W. Grimes, James R. Wilson, Even Skjervold, Jared M. Brown, Apparao Rao and Frank Alexis

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201370011

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      Poly(lactide)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) coated carbon nanotubes are used for controlled delivery of paclitaxel. Thomas Moore and co-workers on page 365 report multifunctional polymer coated carbon nanotubes coated with biodegradable and biocompatible polymers to encapsulate and deliver drugs for a prolonged period of time. Furthermore, the coatings reduce in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo systemic toxicity of carbon nanotubes, which is critical for intravenous administration. Image credit: Robert R. Johnson (University of Pennsylvania)

  2. Inside Front Cover

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      Drug Delivery: In Vitro Evaluation of Non-Protein Adsorbing Breast Cancer Theranostics Based on 19F-Polymer Containing Nanoparticles (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 4/2013) (page 300)

      Christian Porsch, Yuning Zhang, Åsa Östlund, Peter Damberg, Cosimo Ducani, Eva Malmström and Andreas M. Nyström

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201370012

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      Self-assembly of polymer based theranostic nano particles containing chemotherapeutics. This paper by Eva Malmström and Andreas M. Nyström on page 381 describes the detailed synthesis and preparation of polymer theranostics, including the in vitro evaluations of cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects on breast cancer cells, as well as 19F-NMR diffusion studies of the theranostic nanoparticles protein corona.

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      Batteries: Encapsulation of Sulfur in a Hollow Porous Carbon Substrate for Superior Li-S Batteries with Long Lifespan (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 4/2013) (page 392)

      Sen Xin, Ya-Xia Yin, Li-Jun Wan and Yu-Guo Guo

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201370016

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      Hollow carbon particles with hierarchically porous structure are prepared via a simple hydrothermal method with sulfonated polystyrene spheres as templates. Sulfur-carbon composite particles with high lithium electroactivity and excellent cycling stability are obtained by encapsulating chainlike sulfur molecules into the carbon particles, which promises an advanced Li-S battery with long lifespan as presented by Yu-Guo Guo and co-workers on page 321.

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      Editorial Advisory Board: (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 4/2013)

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201370015

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      Contents: (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 4/2013) (pages 301–305)

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201370013

  6. Communications

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    1. Synthesis of Mesoporous SiO2@TiO2 Core/Shell Nanospheres with Enhanced Photocatalytic Properties (pages 306–310)

      Jin-Lin Hu, Hai-Sheng Qian, Jia-Jia Li, Yong Hu, Zheng-Quan Li and Shu-Hong Yu

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200110

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      Mesoporous SiO2@TiO2 core/shell nanospheres with a specific surface area of 567–673 m2 g−1 and an average pore size of 1.5–2.8 nm are successfully prepared using a facile method combining sol-gel and thermal treatment processes. The nanospheres exhibit excellent adsorption capability and photodegradation toward rhodamine B (RhB) in pollutant solution.

    2. Hot-Injection Synthesis of Manganese-Ion-Doped NaYF4:Yb,Er Nanocrystals with Red Up-Converting Emission and Tunable Diameter (pages 311–315)

      Zhennan Wu, Min Lin, Sen Liang, Yi Liu, Hao Zhang and Bai Yang

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200106

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      The hot-injection synthesis of manganese ion (Mn2+)-doped NaYF4:Yb,Er nanocrystals (NCs) with red up-converting emission and the diameter tunable from 8 to 15 nm is demonstrated. The Mn2+ dosage, growth temperature, and heating rate determine the doping modes, including surface doping and interior doping. Surface doping produces small NCs and interior doping contributes to the red emission.

    3. Deep-Eutectic-Assisted Synthesis of Bimodal Porous Carbon Monoliths with High Electrical Conductivities (pages 316–320)

      Daniel Carriazo, María C. Gutiérrez, Ricardo Jiménez, M. Luisa Ferrer and Francisco del Monte

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200157

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      Hierarchically structured graphitic carbons synthesized from deep eutectic solvents exhibit a bicontinuous structure where the continuity of the graphitic domains throughout the entire 3D carbon network provides electrical conductivities of up to 31 S/cm to the depicted monoliths.

    4. Encapsulation of Sulfur in a Hollow Porous Carbon Substrate for Superior Li-S Batteries with Long Lifespan (pages 321–325)

      Sen Xin, Ya-Xia Yin, Li-Jun Wan and Yu-Guo Guo

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300029

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      A hollow carbon substrate is prepared via a simple hydrothermal method with sulfonated polystyrene sphere as the template. A sulfur-carbon composite based on the carbon substrate shows a high electrochemical activity, an ultralong lifespan (255 days, 600 cycles), and a favorable rate capability in a Li-S battery.

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    1. A Silicon Nanowire-Based Electrochemical Sensor with High Sensitivity and Electrocatalytic Activity (pages 326–331)

      Shao Su, Xinpan Wei, Yuanyuan Guo, Yiling Zhong, Yuanyuan Su, Qing Huang, Chunhai Fan and Yao He

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200076

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      A novel type of silicon-based electrochemical nanosensor is developed by using AuNPs-decorated SiNWs array (AuNPs@SiNWsAr) as a high-quality nanoelectrode assembly. The silicon-based nanosensor features high sensitivity, robust stability, and favorable repeatability, enabling sensitive electrochemical detection of various electroactive species.

    2. Fluorinated Eu-Doped SnO2 Nanostructures with Simultaneous Phase and Shape Control and Improved Photoluminescence (pages 332–337)

      Hongkang Wang, Yu Wang, Stephen V. Kershaw, Tak Fu Hung, Jun Xu and Andrey L. Rogach

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200096

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      Fluorinated Eu-doped SnO2 nanostructures with tunable morphology and high-level Eu3+ doping are prepared by a hydrothermal method, using NaF as the morphology controlling agent. The fluorinated surface of SnO2 nanocrystallites efficiently inhibits the hydroxyl quenching effect, which accounts for the improved photoluminescence intensity.

    3. Shape Matters: A Gold Nanoparticle Enabled Shape Memory Polymer Triggered by Laser Irradiation (pages 338–345)

      Zhiwei Xiao, Qiang Wu, Sida Luo, Chuck Zhang, Jeffery Baur, Ryan Justice and Tao Liu

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200088

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      Visible laser irradiation is applied to trigger the macroscopic and microscopic response of gold nanoparticle enabled shape memory polymer nanocomposites. The particle shape (rod versus sphere) is demonstrated to play a critical role in the photothermal conversion efficiency of gold nanoparticles.

    4. CdxHg(1−x)Te Alloy Colloidal Quantum Dots: Tuning Optical Properties from the Visible to Near-Infrared by Ion Exchange (pages 346–354)

      Shuchi Gupta, Olga Zhovtiuk, Aleksandar Vaneski, Yan-Cheng Lin, Wu-Ching Chou, Stephen V. Kershaw and Andrey L. Rogach

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200139

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      Partial ion exchange in nanoparticles is a convenient method to prepare semiconductor alloy quantum dots and heterostructures, where both size and composition can be used to tune electronic properties. Complete exchange is also a useful method to grow some structures from more readily synthesized nanoparticle templates. The optical properties of CdxHg(1−x)Te alloy particles are studied.

    5. Anti-CRLF2 Antibody-Armored Biodegradable Nanoparticles for Childhood B-ALL (pages 355–364)

      Rekha Raghunathan, Swetha Mahesula, Kranthi Kancharla, Preethi Janardhanan, Yeshwant L. A. Jadhav, Robert Nadeau, German P. Villa, Robert L. Cook, Colleen M. Witt, Jonathan A. L. Gelfond, Thomas G. Forsthuber and William E. Haskins

      Article first published online: 27 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200125

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      B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) lymphoblast (blast) internalization of anti-cytokine receptor-like factor 2 (CRLF2) antibody-armored biodegradable nanoparticles (AbBNPs) are investigated. Precise engineering of AbBNPs by size and Ab/BNP ratio may improve the internalization and selectivity of biodegradable nanoparticles for the treatment of leukemia.

    6. Multifunctional Polymer-Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Safe Drug Delivery (pages 365–373)

      Thomas L. Moore, Joshua E. Pitzer, Ramakrishna Podila, Xiaojia Wang, Robert L. Lewis, Stuart W. Grimes, James R. Wilson, Even Skjervold, Jared M. Brown, Apparao Rao and Frank Alexis

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200145

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      Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are coated with poly(lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG). This coating imparts aqueous solubility, thereby improving the toxicological profile of carbon nanotubes. Moreover, the amphiphilic coating enables the ability to load hydrophobic anticancer drugs into the inner PLA layer, making this nanostructure suitable for drug delivery.

  8. Frontispieces

    1. Top of page
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      Nanoparticles: Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Cell Filamentation in Escherichia coli (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 4/2013) (page 374)

      Cindy Gunawan, Wey Yang Teoh, Ricardo, Christopher P. Marquis and Rose Amal

      Article first published online: 22 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201370014

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      Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce transient morphological transformation in Escherichia coli from the native ∼ 2–4 μm rods to 20–40 μm filamentous cells as reported by Rose Amal and co-workers. The filamentation is induced only in response to the solid ZnO residues, while non-observable in the presence of the leached zincpeptide complexes. Free zinc ions induce severe cell rupturing.

  9. Full Papers

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    1. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Cell Filamentation in Escherichia coli (pages 375–380)

      Cindy Gunawan, Wey Yang Teoh, Ricardo, Christopher P. Marquis and Rose Amal

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200152

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      Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) induce transient morphological transformation of Escherichia coli from the native 2-4 μm rod-shaped into 20-40 μm filamentous cells. The response is unique to the Trojan horse-type internalization of undissolved solids of ZnO NPs, whereby subsequent zinc leaching occurs intracellularly.

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      In Vitro Evaluation of Non-Protein Adsorbing Breast Cancer Theranostics Based on 19F-Polymer Containing Nanoparticles (pages 381–390)

      Christian Porsch, Yuning Zhang, Åsa Östlund, Peter Damberg, Cosimo Ducani, Eva Malmström and Andreas M. Nyström

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300018

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      Amphiphilic fluorinated copolymers are self-assembled into nanoparticles and assessed as theranostic delivery platforms. The nanoparticles are evaluated with respect to their doxorubicin encapsulation and release, 19F-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics, and using with several cell-based assessments.

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