Particle & Particle Systems Characterization

Cover image for Vol. 30 Issue 8

August 2013

Volume 30, Issue 8

Pages 647–727

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
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      Surface Modification: Surface Coating Rescues Proteins from Magnetite Nanoparticle Induced Damage (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 8/2013) (page 647)

      Nidhi Joshi, Anindita Mukhopadhyay, Sujit Basak, Goutam De and Krishnananda Chattopadhyay

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201370030

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The image shows the major findings of Goutam De, Krishnananda Chattopadhyay, and coworkers, who studied the interaction between iron oxide nanoparticles and cytochrome c, as reported on page 683. The triangle at the top left shows the binding of the protein onto the surface of the bare particles forming amyloid fibrils (transmission electron microscopy image is shown in the background). Appropriate surface modification inhibits protein binding and amyloid formation (shown in the triangle at the bottom right).

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
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      Biocomposites: Mechanically Robust, Electrically Conductive Biocomposite Films Using Antimicrobial Chitosan-Functionalized Graphenes (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 8/2013) (page 648)

      Santosh Kumar Yadav, Yong Chae Jung, Jin Hee Kim, Yong-Il Ko, Hee Jeong Ryu, Mukesh Kumar Yadav, Yoong Ahm Kim and Jae Whan Cho

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201370031

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An effective way of covalently functionalizing graphene with a biopolymer via nitrene chemistry is demonstrated by Yoong Ahm Kim, Jae Whan Cho, and co-workers on page 721. The mechanical and electrical properties of the biocomposite film are tuned by varying the content of functionalized graphene. The high antimicrobial activity of the biofunctionalized graphene may be due to the presence of biopoly mer on edges of the graphene.

  3. Masthead

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    4. Masthead
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      Masthead: (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 8/2013)

      Version of Record online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201370033

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Creation of Transparent Nanocomposite Films with a Refractive Index of 2.3 Using Polymerizable Silicon Nanoparticles (pages 653–657)

      Guoyan Zhang, Hao Zhang, Haotong Wei, Shoujun Zhu, Zhennan Wu, Zhaoyi Wang, Fei Jia, Jibin Zhang and Bai Yang

      Version of Record online: 30 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200116

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The solution-dispersible phenyl- and vinyl-terminated silicon nanoparticles are prepared via the colloidal chemistry method in p-divinylbenzene and styrene as the solvent along with ligand and transparent nanocomposite films with the refractive index of 2.3 are prepared using these polymerizable silicon nanoparticles.

    2. One-Step In Situ Synthesis of GeO2/Graphene Composites Anode for High-Performance Li-Ion Batteries (pages 658–661)

      Wei Wei and Lin Guo

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300043

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      GeO2/graphene composites are synthesized for the first time. Characterizations reveal the homogeneous dispersion of GeO2 nanoparticles (40–100 nm) on the non-aggregated graphene nanosheets. As anode material for Li ion batteries, the composites exhibit remarkably high reversible capacity (1110.6 mAh g−1), excellent cycling stability (90.0% after 50 cycles), and superior rate capability (≈540 mAh g−1 at 3 A g−1).

    3. Paper-Based Electrodes for Nanoparticles Detection (pages 662–666)

      Claudio Parolo, Mariana Medina-Sánchez, Helena Montón, Alfredo de la Escosura-Muñiz and Arben Merkoçi

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200124

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The fabrication, characterization, and applications of paper-based screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCE) are discussed. In particular, microscopy images of the working electrode surface show a reproducible 3D pattern that enhances the performance of the device compared to that of a polyester-based SPCE. Gold nanoparticles and CdSe@ZnS quantum dots are detected using different electrochemical techniques.

    4. Oxidation Kinetics and Magnetic Properties of Elemental Iron Nanoparticles (pages 667–671)

      Tae-Jong Yoon, Huilin Shao, Ralph Weissleder and Hakho Lee

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300013

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      Highly monodisperse elemental iron nanoparticles with varying sizes are analyzed for their oxidation and magnetic properties. Magnetic measurements show that the Fe-cores assumed magnetization values comparable to those of bulk material. The oxidation rate displays a universal logarithmic growth, which establishes electron tunneling as the main oxidation mechanism.

    5. Deposition of Highly Porous Nanocrystalline Platinum on Functionalized Substrates Through Fluorine-Induced Decomposition of Pt(PF3)4 Adsorbates (pages 672–677)

      Steven J. Randolph, Aurelien Botman and Milos Toth

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300036

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanocrystalline platinum is synthesized at room temperature by co-injecting Pt(PF3)4 and XeF2 vapors onto solid supports in vacuum. The Pt nucleation time scales with chemisorbed fluorine coverage, which is controlled by pre-dosing supports with XeF2, and by optional electron or ion beam irradiation under flowing XeF2. The latter is used to increase the chemisorbed fluorine coverage and localize the Pt growth process.

    6. Composition-Mediated Order-Disorder Transformation in FePt Nanoparticles (pages 678–682)

      Aaron C. Johnston-Peck, David A. Cullen and Joseph B. Tracy

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300028

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Heat-treated alloy FePt nanoparticles transform into L10 FePt and mixed L10/L12 FePt3 intermetallic phases. Enrichment in Pt in some nanoparticles, rather than intrinsic thermodynamic effects, drives phase segregation. FePt nanoparticles of uniform, equimolar composition are expected to transform into phase-pure, highly ordered L10 FePt nanoparticles.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Surface Coating Rescues Proteins from Magnetite Nanoparticle Induced Damage (pages 683–694)

      Nidhi Joshi, Anindita Mukhopadhyay, Sujit Basak, Goutam De and Krishnananda Chattopadhyay

      Version of Record online: 25 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201200148

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The interaction of bare magnetite nanoparticles with a protein can lead to different events depending on the nanoparticle to protein ratio. While rapid binding and electron transfer is preferred at low concentration, oxidative modification and the formation of proto-fibrillar aggregates take place at relatively high nanoparticle concentration. Nanoparticle induced oxidative stress and age can work in combination to compromise cellular quality control processes. Suitable surface modifications of nanoparticles may minimize toxicity.

    2. Influence of the Morphology of Lysozyme-Shelled Microparticles on the Cellular Association, Uptake, and Degradation in Human Breast Adenocarcinoma Cells (pages 695–705)

      Francesca Cavalieri, Marisa Colone, Annarita Stringaro, Mariarosaria Tortora, Annarica Calcabrini, Meifang Zhou and Muthupandian Ashokkumar

      Version of Record online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300025

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Microparticle internalization by confocal microscopy indicates particle intracellular localization and degradation. The different morphology of internalized microbubbles and microparticle is correlated to the kinetics of internalization and degradation.

    3. Amplification of Solar Energy Conversion in Quantum-Confined CdSe-Sensitized TiO2 Photonic Crystals by Trapping Light (pages 706–714)

      Serene Bayram and Lara Halaoui

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300041

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light trapping in photonic crystals can lead to decreasing thickness and rare material needs in thin film and quantum dot solar cells. A significant amplification in photon-to-current conversion is observed for CdSe films adsorbed on TiO2 inverse opals relative to nc-TiO2, over a wide frequency range to the blue of the stop band, while a similar red-edge gain is not observed.

    4. Solution-Based Phototransformation of C60 Nanorods: Towards Improved Electronic Devices (pages 715–720)

      Hamid Reza Barzegar, Christian Larsen, Ludvig Edman and Thomas Wågberg

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      C60 nanorods,grown by a modified liquid–liquid interface precipitation method, are photopolymerized in solution using green laser light. The photo-exposed nanorods are shown to comprise a polymerized-C60 protective shell rendering them insoluble, but dispersable, in common hydrophobic solvents. This practical (in)solubility property in combination with a record-high electron mobility for both as-grown and photo-exposed nanorods, as measured in a field-effect transistor geometry, points out a viable path towards low-cost and large-area solution processing of functional electronic and photovoltaic devices.

    5. Mechanically Robust, Electrically Conductive Biocomposite Films Using Antimicrobial Chitosan-Functionalized Graphenes (pages 721–727)

      Santosh Kumar Yadav, Yong Chae Jung, Jin Hee Kim, Yong-Il Ko, Hee Jeong Ryu, Mukesh Kumar Yadav, Yoong Ahm Kim and Jae Whan Cho

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300044

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An effective way of covalently functionalizing graphene with a chitosan polymer via nitrene chemistry is demonstrated. The effectiveness of the biofunctionalized graphene as a reinforcing filler in a chitosan polymer matrix is verified by the enhancement of the mechanical properties and the electrical conductivity without much loss in the elongation-at-break. The high antimicrobial activity of the biofunctionalized graphene may be because of the presence of chitosan polymer on the edges of the graphene.

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