Particle & Particle Systems Characterization

Cover image for Vol. 31 Issue 1

Special Issue: The Basque Country Special Issue

January 2014

Volume 31, Issue 1

Pages 1–167

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Reviews
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
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      Photodynamic Therapy: Light Harvesting and Photoemission by Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2014) (page 1)

      Amaia Garaikoetxea Arguinzoniz, Emmanuel Ruggiero, Abraha Habtemariam, Javier Hernández-Gil, Luca Salassa and Juan C. Mareque-Rivas

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201470001

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      Juan C. Mareque-Rivas and co-workers report on page 46 the most recent advances in utilizing light harvesting and photoemission by quantum dots and up-converting nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy (PDT) applications. The image, which imitates the official flag of the Basque Country (ikurriña), illustrates a nanoparticle harvesting visible and near infrared light surrounded by different classes of photoactivatable prodrugs targeting selective killing of cancer cells.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Reviews
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
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      Bioanalysis: Enzymatic Growth of Metal and Semiconductor Nanoparticles in Bioanalysis (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2014) (page 2)

      Valeri Pavlov

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201470002

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      Fluorescent semiconductor and metal nanoparticles are ubiquitously used in bioanalysis to highlight the presence of target analytes including enzymes, antibodies, etc. In his Review on page 36, Valery Pavlov describes how biosensing takes advantage of the synthesis of nanoparticles in situ triggered by a recognition event. The enzymatic synthesis of NPs in situ allows significant improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio, which significantly improves the sensitivity of analytical assays. Enzymes generate compounds that influence formation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles.

  3. Back Cover

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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
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    9. Reviews
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    11. Communications
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      Polymer Nanoparticles: Single-Chain Polymer Nanoparticles via Non-Covalent and Dynamic Covalent Bonds (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2014) (page 170)

      Ana Sanchez-Sanchez and José A. Pomposo

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201470006

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      Reversible SCNPs are versatile nano-objects for nanomedicine, sensing, and catalysis, although other different end-use applications of SCNPs have been also proposed (e.g., self-curing coatings and self-healing surfaces). The evolution of the relatively new field of responsive SCNPs constructed via non-covalent, or supramolecular, interactions and “dynamic” covalent bonds is reviewed by Ana Sanchez-Sanchez and Jose A. Pomposo on page 11.

  4. Masthead

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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
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      Masthead: (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2014)

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201470005

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Reviews
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
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      Contents: (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2014) (pages 3–8)

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201470003

  6. Editorial

    1. Top of page
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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
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    9. Reviews
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
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      The Basque Country Special Issue (pages 9–10)

      Luis M. Liz-Marzán

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300374

  7. Progress Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Reviews
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. Single-Chain Polymer Nanoparticles via Non-Covalent and Dynamic Covalent Bonds (pages 11–23)

      Ana Sanchez-Sanchez and José A. Pomposo

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300245

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      A description of the state of the art in the design, synthesis routes, and applications of reversible single-chain polymer nanoparticles (SCNPs) is provided. After an overview of the main non-covalent interactions and dynamic covalent bonds currently used in supramolecular polymers and dynamic materials, the focus is turned to the different reported synthetic approaches and potential applications of (multi-)responsive unimolecular soft nanoparticles.

    2. Uptake, Biological Fate, and Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles (pages 24–35)

      Jordi Llop, Irina Estrela-Lopis, Ronald F. Ziolo, Africa González, Jana Fleddermann, Marco Dorn, Vanessa Gomez Vallejo, Rosana Simon-Vazquez, Edwin Donath, Zwengei Mao, Changyou Gao and Sergio E. Moya

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300323

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      The study of the biological fate of metal oxide nanoparticles is fundamental to understand their possible toxicological action. The biodistribution, organ accumulation, and fate of radiolabelled metal oxide nanoparticles have been determined in animal models by means of positron emission tomography for different exposure ways. At the cellular level, ion beam microscopy was applied to quantify the intracellular dose of label-free nanoparticles and to asset their localization.

  8. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Reviews
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. Enzymatic Growth of Metal and Semiconductor Nanoparticles in Bioanalysis (pages 36–45)

      Valeri Pavlov

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300295

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This review describes how biosensing takes advantage of the synthesis of nanoparticles in situ triggered by a recognition event. The enzymatic synthesis of NPs in situ allows to improve significantly the signal to noise ratio improving significantly sensitivity of analytical assays. Enzymes generate compounds influencing formation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles.

    2. Light Harvesting and Photoemission by Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy (pages 46–75)

      Amaia Garaikoetxea Arguinzoniz, Emmanuel Ruggiero, Abraha Habtemariam, Javier Hernández-Gil, Luca Salassa and Juan C. Mareque-Rivas

      Article first published online: 19 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300314

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      The unique light harvesting, photoinduced charge transfer, and photoemission properties of quantum dots (QDs) and upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) open up new opportunities for advancing in the applicability and efficiency of photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an emerging cancer treatment modality.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Reviews
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
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      Nanodumbbells: Gold Spiky Nanodumbbells: Anisotropy in Gold Nanostars (Part. Part. Syst. Charact. 1/2014) (page 76)

      Sergey M. Novikov, Ana Sánchez-Iglesias, Mikołaj K. Schmidt, Andrey Chuvilin, Javier Aizpurua, Marek Grzelczak and Luis M. Liz-Marzán

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201470004

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      Plasmonic resonances of novel gold spiky nanodumbbells can be probed by both optical and electron microscopies, allowing for a complete characterization of their optical activity. The image illustrates an exemplary plasmon map of such a nanodumbbell, obtained from the integrated EELS signal, illustrating the longitudinal nature of the induced plasmonic mode.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Reviews
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. Gold Spiky Nanodumbbells: Anisotropy in Gold Nanostars (pages 77–80)

      Sergey M. Novikov, Ana Sánchez-Iglesias, Mikołaj K. Schmidt, Andrey Chuvilin, Javier Aizpurua, Marek Grzelczak and Luis M. Liz-Marzán

      Article first published online: 4 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300257

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      A new type of gold nanoparticle—called “spiky nanodumbbells”—is introduced. These particles combine the anisotropy of nanorods with sharp nanoscale features of nanostars, which are important for SERS applications. Both the morphology and the optical response of the particles are characterized in detail, and the experimental results are compared with FDTD simulations, showing good agreement.

  11. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Reviews
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Full Papers
    1. Gold-Coated Iron Oxide Glyconanoparticles for MRI, CT, and US Multimodal Imaging (pages 81–87)

      Mónica Carril, Itziar Fernández, Juan Rodríguez, Isabel García and Soledad Penadés

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300239

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      The application of gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles as trimodal contrast agents for MRI, X-ray CT, and US is presented. Phantoms of different concentrations are measured in all three modalities at the same concentration for comparison purposes. Additionally, the effect of the energy of X-rays and the surrounding media of the samples is evaluated.

    2. Electrospinning of Tetraphenylporphyrin Compounds into Wires (pages 88–93)

      Wiwat Nuansing, Evangelos Georgilis, Thales V. A. G. de Oliveira, Georgios Charalambidis, Aitziber Eleta, Athanassios G. Coutsolelos, Anna Mitraki and Alexander M. Bittner

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300293

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      Electrospinning is normally employed to produce polymer fibres. Here, it is used to shape pure porphyrins into wires. The functionalization with the self-assembling peptide diphenylalanine is especially helpful: Diphenylalanine can be electrospun to quasi-endless wires, and also supports the process for tetraphenylporphyrin.

    3. Pickering-Stabilized Latexes with High Silica Incorporation and Improved Salt Stability (pages 94–100)

      Karim González-Matheus, G. Patricia Leal and and Jose M. Asua

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300261

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      Miniemulsion polymerization using surface modified silica as Pickering stabilizer allows obtaining coagulum free high solids content polymer dispersions with an incorporation of silica exceeding 90 wt%. These dispersions present a better salt tolerance than latexes stabilized with conventional emulsifiers (SLS, PVOH).

    4. Production of Cationic Nanogels with Potential Use in Controlled Drug Delivery (pages 101–109)

      Aintzane Pikabea, Jose Ramos and Jacqueline Forcada

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300265

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      The analysis of the swelling behavior of poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl) methacrylate (PDEAEMA)-based nanogel particles, presenting a dual-dependent thermo- and pH-sensitivity tunable with the ionic strength, indicates that these nanogels undergo a unique transition from a swollen to a collapsed state at physiological conditions. This tunable and dual sensitivity makes them attractive and potentially applicable in the field of controlled drug delivery.

    5. Microwave Synthesis of LTL Zeolites with Tunable Size and Morphology: An Optimal Support for Metal-Catalyzed Hydrogen Production from Biogas Reforming Processes (pages 110–120)

      Leire Gartzia-Rivero, Jorge Bañuelos, Urko Izquierdo, Victoria Laura Barrio, Kepa Bizkarra, José F. Cambra and Iñigo López-Arbeloa

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300275

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      Microwave heating provides high-quality LTL zeolites with tunable size and shape. This host is an ideal support for hydrogen production via metal-assisted catalysis from biogas. Rhodium- and nickel-based bimetallic catalysts are prepared and tested in the dry and oxidative biogas reforming processes at 800 °C and atmospheric pressure.

    6. The Influence of Molecular Structure on the Self-Assembly of Phenanthroline Derivatives into Crystalline Nanowires (pages 121–125)

      Marek Grzelczak, Niksa Kulisic, Maurizio Prato and Aurelio Mateo-Alonso

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300289

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      Molecular structure rules! The progressive linear expansion of conjugation with fused aromatic rings provides phenanthrolines with increasing amphiphilic behavior and larger π-contact, and thus with an enhanced ability to self-organize into crystalline nanowires of different dimensions.

    7. CdTe-Based QDs: Preparation, Cytotoxicity, and Tumor Cell Death by Targeting Transferrin Receptor (pages 126–133)

      Juan Gallo, Isabel García, Nuria Genicio and Soledad Penadés

      Article first published online: 20 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300291

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      CdTe-based QDs are synthesized in water by a one-pot method and capped with different molecules including biocompatible carbohydrates. Their optical properties and cellular toxicity are investigated. An anti-CD71 IgG QD that targets transferrin receptor demonstrates its potential to selectively cause cellular death.

    8. Production of 18F-Labeled Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles by Proton Irradiation for Biodistribution and Biological Fate Studies in Rats (pages 134–142)

      Carlos Pérez-Campaña, Francesc Sansaloni, Vanessa Gómez-Vallejo, Zuriñe Baz, Abraham Martin, Sergio E. Moya, Juan I. Lagares, Ronald F. Ziolo and Jordi Llop

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300302

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      18O-enriched TiO2 nanoparticles are labeled with 18F by direct bombardment with protons via the 18O(p,n)18F nuclear reaction. The irradiation process does not significantly modify the morphological properties of the nanoparticles. Incorporation of the radiolabel enables the determination of the biological fate in rats up to 8 h after intravenous and oral administration using positron emission tomography.

    9. Comparison of the Emulsion Mixing and In Situ Polymerization Techniques for Synthesis of Water-Borne Reduced Graphene Oxide/Polymer Composites: Advantages and Drawbacks (pages 143–151)

      Alejandro Arzac, Gracia Patricia Leal, Radek Fajgar and Radmila Tomovska

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300286

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      Emulsion mixing and in situ polymerization techniques are compared for synthesis of water-borne polymer/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) composites. Scanning electron microscopy of the hybrid latexes monolayer shows that the polymer blend is composed from polymer particles covered by weakly bonded rGO, whereas the in situ composite presents composite platelets composed from rGO with polymer particles densely packed on both its surfaces.

    10. Optical Response of Metallic Nanoparticle Heteroaggregates with Subnanometric Gaps (pages 152–160)

      Christos Tserkezis, Richard W. Taylor, Jan Beitner, Rubén Esteban, Jeremy J. Baumberg and Javier Aizpurua

      Article first published online: 9 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300287

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      Metallic nanoparticle heteroaggregates with subnanometric interparticle gaps are theoretically and experimentally studied. Two-component heteroaggregates composed of two different particle sizes or materials are designed, and their far- and near-field optical properties are analyzed in terms of excitation of modes associated with nanoparticle chains within the heteroclusters.

    11. In Situ Monitoring of DNA-Aptavalve Gating Function on Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles (pages 161–167)

      Veli C. Özalp, Alessandro Pinto, Elizaveta Nikulina, Andrey Chuvilin and Thomas Schäfer

      Article first published online: 21 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ppsc.201300299

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      DNA–aptamer nanovalves have promising applications as stimuli-responsive molecular gates for controlling cargo release rates from nanoparticles, allowing potentially important progress in smart drug delivery. A method based on circular dichroism spectrometry is used for elucidating in situ the mechanical movements of such aptamer nanovalves immobilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

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