Nitric oxide levels and ciliary beat frequency in indigenous New Zealand children

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Abstract

New Zealand children's morbidity from respiratory disease is high. This study examines whether subclinical ciliary abnormalities underlie the increased prevalence of respiratory disease in indigenous New Zealand children. A prospective study enrolled a group of healthy children who were screened for respiratory disease by questionnaire and lung function. Skin-prick tests were performed to control for atopy. Exhaled and nasal NO was measured online by a single-breath technique using chemiluminescence. Ciliary specimens were obtained by nasal brushings for assessment of structure and function. The ciliary beat frequency (CBF) (median CBF, 12.5 Hz; range, 10.4–16.8 Hz) and NO values (median exhaled NO, 5.6 ppb; range, 2.3–87.7 ppb; median nasal NO, 403 ppb; range, 34–1,120 ppb) for healthy New Zealand European (n = 58), Pacific Island (n = 61), and Maori (n = 16) children were comparable with levels reported internationally. No ethnic differences in NO, atopy, or CBF were demonstrated. Despite an apparently normal ciliary beat, the percentage of ciliary structural defects was 3 times higher than reported controls (9%; range, 3.6–31.3%), with no difference across ethnic groups. In conclusion, it is unlikely that subclinical ciliary abnormalities underlie the increased prevalence of respiratory disease in indigenous New Zealand children. The high percentage of secondary ciliary defects suggests ongoing environmental or infective damage. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2005; 39:238–246. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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