Impact of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus co-infection in severe bronchiolitis

Authors

  • Paul S. McNamara MBBS, MRCP, PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Child Health, Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital, Eaton Rd, Liverpool L12 2AP, United Kingdom
    2. Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Liverpool, Daulby Street, Liverpool L69 3GA, United Kingdom
    • Institute of Child Health, Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital, Eaton Rd, Liverpool L12 2AP, United Kingdom.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Brian F. Flanagan BSc, PhD,

    1. Department of Immunology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Rosalind L. Smyth MD, FRCPCH,

    1. Institute of Child Health, Royal Liverpool Children's Hospital, Eaton Rd, Liverpool L12 2AP, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author
  • C. Anthony Hart FRCPCH, FRCPath

    1. Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Liverpool, Daulby Street, Liverpool L69 3GA, United Kingdom
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Some of these data has been presented in the form of a poster at an RSV symposium, October 2005, in Oxford, UK.

Abstract

We have previously shown high rates of co-infection with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) in infants with severe bronchiolitis at our institution in 2000–2002, and that co-infection was associated with increased disease severity. In this study, we have attempted to identify differences in intubated infants with severe RSV infection with and without hMPV co-infection. Here we show that RSV+/hMPV+ were clinically symptomatic for longer than RSV+/hMPV− infants, but that no differences in airway total cell concentration, differential cell count or cytokine/chemokine concentrations were detectable. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2007; 42:740–743. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary