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Functional protein microarray as molecular decathlete: A versatile player in clinical proteomics

Authors

  • Heng Zhu,

    Corresponding author
    1. The Center for High-Throughput Biology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, MD, USA
    2. Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, MD, USA
    • Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, MD, USA
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  • Eric Cox,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, MD, USA
    2. Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology Graduate Program, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, MD, USA
    3. Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, MD, USA
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  • Jiang Qian

    1. Department of Ophthalmology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, MD, USA
    2. Kimmel Cancer Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, MD, USA
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  • Colour Online: See the article online to view Figs. 1–4 in colour.

Correspondence: Dr. Heng Zhu, Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences Johns Hopkins University, 733 N. Broadway, Edward D. Miller Research Building, Room 333, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA

E-mail: Heng.Zhu@jhmi.edu

Fax: +1-410-502-1872

Abstract

Functional protein microarrays were developed as a high-throughput tool to overcome the limitations of DNA microarrays and to provide a versatile platform for protein functional analyses. Recent years have witnessed tremendous growth in the use of protein microarrays, particularly functional protein microarrays, to address important questions in the field of clinical proteomics. In this review, we will summarize some of the most innovative and exciting recent applications of protein microarrays in clinical proteomics, including biomarker identification, pathogen–host interactions, and cancer biology.

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