Using proteomics to uncover extracellular matrix interactions during cardiac remodeling

Authors

  • Nicolle L. Patterson,

    1. San Antonio Cardiovascular Proteomics Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    2. Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies and the Division of Geriatrics, Gerontology and Palliative Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    3. Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    4. Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Rugmani Padmanabhan Iyer,

    1. San Antonio Cardiovascular Proteomics Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    2. Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies and the Division of Geriatrics, Gerontology and Palliative Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    3. Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Lisandra E. de Castro Brás,

    1. San Antonio Cardiovascular Proteomics Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    2. Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies and the Division of Geriatrics, Gerontology and Palliative Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    3. Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Yaojun Li,

    1. San Antonio Cardiovascular Proteomics Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    2. Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies and the Division of Geriatrics, Gerontology and Palliative Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    3. Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Thomas G. Andrews,

    1. Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute and Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Gregory J. Aune,

    1. San Antonio Cardiovascular Proteomics Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    2. Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute and Department of Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Richard A. Lange,

    1. San Antonio Cardiovascular Proteomics Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Merry L. Lindsey

    Corresponding author
    1. Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies and the Division of Geriatrics, Gerontology and Palliative Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    2. Department of Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    • San Antonio Cardiovascular Proteomics Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
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Correspondence: Dr. Merry L. Lindsey, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2500 North State Street, Room G351–04, Jackson, MS 39216–4505, USA

E-mail: mllindsey@umc.edu

Fax: +1-601-984-1817

Abstract

The left ventricle (LV) responds to a myocardial infarction with an orchestrated sequence of events that result in fundamental changes to both the structure and function of the myocardium. This collection of responses is termed as LV remodeling. Myocardial ischemia resulting in necrosis is the initiating event that culminates in the formation of an extracellular matrix (ECM) rich infarct scar that replaces necrotic myocytes. While the cardiomyocyte is the major cell type that responds to ischemia, infiltrating leukocytes and cardiac fibroblasts coordinate the subsequent wound healing response. The matrix metalloproteinase family of enzymes regulates the inflammatory and ECM responses that modulate scar formation. Matridomics is the proteomic evaluation focused on ECM, while degradomics is the proteomic evaluation of proteases as well as their inhibitors and substrates. This review will summarize the use of proteomics to better understand matrix metalloproteinase roles in post myocardial infarction LV remodeling.

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