The pig as an animal model for human pathologies: A proteomics perspective

Authors

  • Anna Bassols,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Facultat de Veterinària, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
    • Correspondence: Dr. Anna Bassols, Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Facultat de Veterinària, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain

      E-mail: anna.bassols@uab.cat

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  • Cristina Costa,

    1. New Therapies of Genes and Transplants Group, Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain
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  • P. David Eckersall,

    1. Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK
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  • Jesús Osada,

    1. Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, CIBEROBN, Zaragoza, Spain
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  • Josefa Sabrià,

    1. Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular, Facultat de Medicina, Institut de Neurociències (INc), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
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  • Joan Tibau

    1. IRTA – Food Technology, Animal Genetics Program, Finca Camps i Armet, Monells, Spain
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  • Colour Online: See the article online to view Fig. 1 in colour.

Abstract

Traditional biomedical models are easy to manage in experimental facilities and allow fast and affordable basic genetic studies related to human disorders, but in some cases they do not always represent the complexity of their physiology. Translational medicine demands selected models depending on the particularities of the human disease to be investigated, reproducing as closely as possible the evolution, clinical symptoms and molecular pathways, cells or tissues involved in the dysfunction. Thus, pig models offer an alternative because of their anatomical and physiological similarities to humans and the availability of genomic, transcriptomic and, progressively more, proteomic tools for analysis of this species. Furthermore, there is a wide range of natural, selected and transgenic porcine breeds. The present review provides a summary of the applications of the pig as a model for metabolic, cardiovascular, infectious diseases, xenotransplantation and neurological disorders and an overview of the possibilities that the diverse proteomic techniques offer to study these pathologies in depth.

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