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Mike Dunn

With this issue of Proteomics Clinical Applications we are publishing the latest revision of the Instructions to Authors for the journal that include some extensive additions and amendments. We are doing this to improve clarity and ensure the maintenance of our high standards in reporting of clinical proteomics studies. In this Editorial I will report on the most important of these revisions. However, authors preparing manuscripts for submission to the journal are urged to consult the full Instructions to Authors that can be accessed online in HTML format with hyperlinks to different sections or other pages (http://forauthors.clinical.proteomics-journal.com).

Major changes have been made to Section 5 “Experimental design, description, and validation”. The requirements for full details of the experimental design and, where applicable, of patient groups and clinical samples have been expanded and made more rigorous. The need for data validation in comparative or shotgun-like discovery studies has been clarified. It is now mandatory that confirmatory data (e.g. from validated immunoassays, immunohistochemistry, alternative MS-based methods, Western blotting, etc.) using independent replication sets be provided for at least a subset of proteins.

Deposition of supporting data in a public and global open access database is strongly recommended for all types of manuscript and is mandatory for Dataset Briefs. Where an author states that a dataset is being made available as an integral part of a submitted manuscript of an type, this must be within a public and global open access database and not solely in a private or institute website (although that can occur simultaneously), to ensure permanent availability of the dataset. Examples of such suitable global, open access databases are the ProteomeXchange consortium (http://www.proteomexchange.org) (including the receiving repositories PRIDE and PASSEL) or World-2DPAGE (http://world-2dpage.expasy.org/repository/).

Since Proteomics Clinical Applications commenced publication in January 2007, we have had a type of manuscript called “Rapid Communication”. The concept of these articles was that they were intended to describe results that were brief, timely and of such importance that rapid publication was warranted. However, this manuscript type has not been attractive to potential authors and very few papers of this type have been published. In this latest revision of the Instructions to Authors for the journal we have therefore decided to delete this manuscript type from the list of types of contributions (see Section 4).

I look forward to seeing your manuscripts submitted online soon!

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Mike Dunn

Editor-in-Chief