Quantum information processing in optical lattices and magnetic microtraps

Authors

  • P. Treutlein,

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    • Phone: +49 89 2180-3937, Fax: +49 89 2180-3938

  • T. Steinmetz,

    1. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik und Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Schellingstr. 4, 80799 München, Germany
    2. Present address: Laboratoire Kastler Brossel de l'E.N.S, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France
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  • Y. Colombe,

    1. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik und Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Schellingstr. 4, 80799 München, Germany
    2. Present address: Laboratoire Kastler Brossel de l'E.N.S, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France
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  • B. Lev,

    1. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik und Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Schellingstr. 4, 80799 München, Germany
    2. Present address: Dept. of Physics UCB/JILA, Boulder, CO 80309-0440, USA
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  • P. Hommelhoff,

    1. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik und Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Schellingstr. 4, 80799 München, Germany
    2. Present address: Varian Physics Building, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
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  • J. Reichel,

    1. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik und Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Schellingstr. 4, 80799 München, Germany
    2. Present address: Laboratoire Kastler Brossel de l'E.N.S, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France
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  • M. Greiner,

    1. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik und Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Schellingstr. 4, 80799 München, Germany
    2. Present address: Harvard University, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
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  • O. Mandel,

    1. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik und Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Schellingstr. 4, 80799 München, Germany
    2. Present address: Laboratoire Kastler Brossel de l'E.N.S, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France
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  • A. Widera,

    1. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik und Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Schellingstr. 4, 80799 München, Germany
    2. Present address: Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz, Germany
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  • T. Rom,

    1. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik und Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Schellingstr. 4, 80799 München, Germany
    2. Present address: Harvard University, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
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  • I. Bloch,

    1. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik und Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Schellingstr. 4, 80799 München, Germany
    2. Present address: Harvard University, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
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  • TheodorW. Hänsch

    1. Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik und Sektion Physik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Schellingstr. 4, 80799 München, Germany
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  • arXiv.org/quant-ph/0605163

Abstract

We review our experiments on quantum information processing with neutral atoms in optical lattices and magnetic microtraps. Atoms in an optical lattice in the Mott insulator regime serve as a large qubit register. A spin-dependent lattice is used to split and delocalize the atomic wave functions in a controlled and coherent way over a defined number of lattice sites. This is used to experimentally demonstrate a massively parallel quantum gate array, which allows the creation of a highly entangled many-body cluster state through coherent collisions between atoms on neighbouring lattice sites. In magnetic microtraps on an atom chip, we demonstrate coherent manipulation of atomic qubit states and measure coherence lifetimes exceeding one second at micron-distance from the chip surface. We show that microwave near-fields on the chip can be used to create state-dependent potentials for the implementation of a quantum controlled phase gate with these robust qubit states. For single atom detection and preparation, we have developed high finesse fiber Fabry-Perot cavities and integrated them on the ato m chip. We present an experiment in which we detected a very small number of cold atoms magnetically trapped in the cavity using the atom chip.

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