Evidence for an association between prostate cancer and chromosome 8q24 and 10q11 genetic variants in African American men: The flint men's health study

Authors

  • Yunfei Wang,

    1. Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    2. Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
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  • Anna M. Ray,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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  • Emilie K. Johnson,

    1. Department of Urology, University of Michigan Medical School, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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  • Kimberly A. Zuhlke,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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  • Kathleen A. Cooney,

    1. Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan
    2. Department of Urology, University of Michigan Medical School, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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  • Ethan M. Lange

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Genetics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    2. Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    3. Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    • Assistant Professor, Department of Genetics, 5111 Genetics Medicine Building, 120 Mason Farm Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7264.
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  • Yunfei Wang and Anna M. Ray contributed equally to this work.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non-skin cancer in men in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality. African American men have substantially increased risk of both being diagnosed and dying from the disease. Recent genome-wide genetic association studies have identified a number of common single nucleotide genetic polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with prostate cancer in men of European descent. Only a small number of studies have evaluated the association between these genetic variants and prostate cancer in African Americans.

METHODS

We used logistic regression models to assess the association between prostate cancer in African American men and 24 SNPs from regions previously reported to be associated with prostate cancer in men of European descent.

RESULTS

We found nominal evidence (P < 0.05) for association between prostate cancer and three chromosome 8q24 (rs6983561, rs16901979, and rs7000448) and two 10q11 (rs7904463 and rs10740051) SNPs.

CONCLUSIONS

We confirm recent reports that 8q24 variants identified to be associated with prostate cancer in men of European descent are also associated with prostate cancer in African Americans. Our report is the first to find evidence of association between SNPs near MSMB and prostate cancer in African Americans. Of note, rs7000448 is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs10761581 in NCOA4, a SNP that has been implicated to be independently associated, with respect to the widely reported SNP rs10993994 in the nearby gene MSMB, with prostate cancer in men of European descent. Prostate 71:225–231, 2011. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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