Strain-specific induction of experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) in mice

Authors

  • Christopher M. Jackson,

    1. Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Dallas B. Flies,

    1. Department of Immunology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut
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  • Claudio A. Mosse,

    1. Departments of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee
    2. Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, Tennessee
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    • Chief of Pathology and Lab Medicine.

  • Anil Parwani,

    1. Pathology Informatics and Staff Pathologist, Shadyside Hospital, UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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    • Division Director.

  • Edward L. Hipkiss,

    1. Department of Biology, Penn State Mont Alto, Mont Alto, Pennsylvania
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  • Charles G. Drake

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
    2. Brady Department of Urology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
    • Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1650 Orleans St., CRB I #410, Baltimore, MD 21231.
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  • The authors have no financial conflicts of interest relevant to this work.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prostatitis, a clinical syndrome characterized by pelvic pain and inflammation, is common in adult males. Although several induced and spontaneous murine models of prostatitis have been explored, the role of genetic background on induction has not been well-defined.

METHODS

Using a standard methodology for the induction of experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP), we investigated both acute and chronic inflammation on several murine genetic backgrounds.

RESULTS

In our colony, nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice evinced spontaneous prostatitis that was not augmented by immunization with rat prostate extract (RPE). In contrast, the standard laboratory strain Balb/c developed chronic inflammation in response to RPE immunization. Development of EAP in other strains was variable.

CONCLUSIONS

These data suggest that Balb/c mice injected with RPE may provide a useful model for chronic prostatic inflammation. Prostate 73: 651–656, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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