MurD ligase from E. coli: Tetrahedral intermediate formation study by hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical replica path method

Authors

  • Andrej Perdih,

    1. Laboratory for Molecular Modeling and NMR Spectroscopy, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1001 Ljubljana, Slovenia
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  • Milan Hodoscek,

    1. Laboratory for Molecular Modeling and NMR Spectroscopy, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1001 Ljubljana, Slovenia
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  • Tom Solmajer

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory for Molecular Modeling and NMR Spectroscopy, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1001 Ljubljana, Slovenia
    • National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1001 Ljubljana, Slovenia
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Abstract

MurD (UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine:D-glutamate ligase), a three-domain bacterial protein, catalyses a highly specific incorporation of D-glutamate to the cytoplasmic intermediate UDP-N-acetyl-muramoyl-L-alanine (UMA) utilizing ATP hydrolysis to ADP and Pi. This reaction is part of a biosynthetic path yielding bacterial peptidoglycan. On the basis of structural studies of MurD complexes, a stepwise catalytic mechanism was proposed that commences with a formation of the acyl-phosphate intermediate, followed by a nucleophilic attack of D-glutamate that, through the formation of a tetrahedral reaction intermediate and subsequent phosphate dissociation, affords the final product, UDP-N-acetyl-muramoyl-L-alanine-D-glutamate (UMAG). A hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular modeling approach was utilized, combining the B3LYP QM level of theory with empirical force field simulations to evaluate three possible reaction pathways leading to tetrahedral intermediate formation. Geometries of the starting structures based on crystallographic experimental data and tetrahedral intermediates were carefully examined together with a role of crucial amino acids and water molecules. The replica path method was used to generate the reaction pathways between the starting structures and the corresponding tetrahedral reaction intermediates, offering direct comparisons with a sequential kinetic mechanism and the available structural data for this enzyme. The acquired knowledge represents new and valuable information to assist in the ongoing efforts leading toward novel inhibitors of MurD as potential antibacterial drugs. Proteins 2009. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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