Shipboard polymerization of acrylic acid

Authors

  • J. J. Kurland,

    1. Union Carbide Corporation, Technical Center, South Charleston, West Virginia 25303
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Jonathan J. Kurland, a Research Scientist in the Solvents and Coatings Materials Division of Union Carbide earned his B.A. at the University of Pennsylvania and his A.M. and Ph.D. in chemistry at Harvard University. He joined Carbide in 1968 after post-doctoral work at Columbia University. He is active in research in oxidation and free-radical chemistry and in process development and serves on an Intercompany Committee on Handling Acrylic Monomers.

  • D. R. Bryant

    1. Union Carbide Corporation, Technical Center, South Charleston, West Virginia 25303
    Search for more papers by this author
    • David R. Bryant a Senior Corporate Fellow at Union Carbide, was awarded a Ph.D. in chemistry at Duke University. In addition to his work in the acrylates area, he has had extensive experience in homogeneous catalysis with precious metals.


Abstract

In 1975 glacial acrylic acid polymerized in a tank of the S.S. Alchemist four days from port. Vapor and liquid vented at high pressure for three hours. Retained acid was stable. Probably steam leaking into steam coils or a deadheaded pump caused overheating that set off polymerization.

Ancillary