Causes of ammonia plant shutdowns survey V

Authors

  • Gerald P. Williams,

    1. Allied Corporation, P.O. Box 762, Hopewell, VA 23860
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    • G. P. Williams holds a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from Penn State University. He has had various engineering assignments in his 23 years with Allied/Signal Corp. mainly in fertilizer and caprolactam processes. Presently, he is a senior process engineer at the Hopewell, Va. Plant, serves on the AIChE Ammonia Safety Committee, and on the Editorial Review Board for this magazine.

  • William W. Hoehing,

    1. Allied Corporation, P.O. Box 762, Hopewell, VA 23860
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    • W. W. Hoehing holds a B.S. degree from Drexel University, and an M.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. He was Technical Director at Allied Chemical Corporation for thirty-one years and was Licensing Manager at Exxon Chemical for six years. He is currently a consultant.

  • Robert G. Byington

    1. Allied Corporation, P.O. Box 762, Hopewell, VA 23860
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    • R. G. Byington holds a B.S. degree from Lafayette College. He spent eight years as a process engineer at Exxon Chemical and is currently a computer analyst at Simcon Company.


Abstract

The onstream factor for large tonnage ammonia plants has plummeted to 80.8 percent as inventory control and feedstock curtailment cause almost fifty percent of total downtime.

Ancillary