Vaporization and dispersion modeling of contained refrigerated liquid spills

Authors

  • D. W. Studer,

    1. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Process Engineering, Box 538, Allentown, PA 18195
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    • David W. Studer is a Senior Principal Engineer in the Process Engineering Department of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. He received his B.S. degree in Chemistry from the University of Cincinnati and M.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Delaware.

  • B. A. Cooper,

    1. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Process Engineering, Box 538, Allentown, PA 18195
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    • Beth A. Cooper, a Process Engineer at Air Products and Chemicals, is currently involved in process development for Polymer Chemicals. She received her M.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Delaware and her BSChE from Virginia Tech.

  • L. C. Doelp

    1. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Process Engineering, Box 538, Allentown, PA 18195
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    • Louis C. Doelp is the Senior Engineering Associate in the Corporate Engineering Department of Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. He received his B.S. from the Univ. of Pennsylvania and M.S. from Villanova Univ., both in Chemical Engineering. He is the author of nine patents and ten publications.


Abstract

The modeling of evaporation and dispersion from chemical spills has been an active area. The available models span the range of very simple calculational methods, for quick response at the time of accidents, to more complex transient models that predict the results of hypothesized events. Conservative assumptions are often used in all of these models in place of more accurate and more complicated computational techniques.

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