Sublethal effects of spinosad on survival, growth and reproduction of Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

Authors

  • Dong Wang,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, PR China
    2. Department of Plant Protection, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018, PR China
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  • Peiyu Gong,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, PR China
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  • Mei Li,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, PR China
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  • Xinghui Qiu,

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, PR China
    • State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, PR China.
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  • Kaiyun Wang

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Plant Protection, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018, PR China
    • Department of Plant Protection, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, Shandong 271018, PR China.
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Abstract

BACKGROUND:Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) is one of the most important pests in many countries. Spinosad is used widely for the control of pests, but there is sparse information available regarding its sublethal effects on H. armigera. Here, the authors attempt to investigate the sublethal effects of spinosad on H. armigera in order to reveal the negative, non-lethal impact of insecticides on this pest.

RESULTS: The toxicity of spinosad against H. armigera was determined under laboratory conditions by oral exposure of late second-instar larvae to the compound. The 48 h LC50 and 72 h LC50 values of spinosad to this pest were found to be 0.41 mg kg−1 and 0.35 mg kg−1 respectively. Spinosad at sublethal concentrations significantly extended the developmental time of survivor larvae, and reduced larval wet weight. Post-exposure effects were indicated by decreased pupation ratio and pupal weight, by prolonged prepupal and pupal periods and by decreased emergence ratio, fecundity and longevity of adults.

CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the combination of lethal and sublethal effects of spinosad might affect pest population dynamics significantly by decreasing its survival and reproduction, and by delaying its development. Copyright © 2008 Society of Chemical Industry

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