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Cross-resistance study and biochemical mechanisms of thiamethoxam resistance in B-biotype Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

Authors

  • Yuntao Feng,

    1. Department of Plant Protection, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, PR China
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  • Qingjun Wu,

    1. Department of Plant Protection, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, PR China
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  • Shaoli Wang,

    1. Department of Plant Protection, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, PR China
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  • Xiaoli Chang,

    1. Department of Plant Protection, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, PR China
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  • Wen Xie,

    1. Department of Plant Protection, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, PR China
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  • Baoyun Xu,

    1. Department of Plant Protection, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, PR China
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  • Youjun Zhang

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Plant Protection, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, PR China
    • Department of Plant Protection, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, PR China.
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Abstract

BACKGROUND: B-biotype Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) has invaded China over the past two decades. To understand the risks and to determine possible mechanisms of resistance to thiamethoxam in B. tabaci, a resistant strain was selected in the laboratory. Cross-resistance and the biochemical mechanisms of thiamethoxam resistance were investigated in the present study.

RESULTS: A 66.3-fold thiamethoxam-resistant B. tabaci strain (TH-R) was established after selection for 36 generations. Compared with the susceptible strain (TH-S), the selected TH-R strain showed obvious cross-resistance to imidacloprid (47.3-fold), acetamiprid (35.8-fold), nitenpyram (9.99-fold), abamectin (5.33-fold) and carbosulfan (4.43-fold). No cross-resistance to fipronil, chlorpyrifos or deltamethrin was seen. Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and triphenyl phosphate (TPP) exhibited significant synergism on thiamethoxam effects in the TH-R strain (3.14- and 2.37-fold respectively). However, diethyl maleate (DEM) did not act synergistically with thiamethoxam. Biochemical assays showed that cytochrome P450 monooxygenase activities increased 1.21- and 1.68-fold respectively, and carboxylesterase activity increased 2.96-fold in the TH-R strain. However, no difference was observed for glutathione S-transferase between the two strains.

CONCLUSION: B-biotype B. tabaci develops resistance to thiamethoxam. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase and carboxylesterase appear to be responsible for the resistance. Reasonable resistance management that avoids the use of cross-resistance insecticides may delay the development of resistance to thiamethoxam in this species. Copyright © 2009 Society of Chemical Industry

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