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Pyramiding and evaluation of three dominant brown planthopper resistance genes in the elite indica rice 9311 and its hybrids

Authors

  • Jie Hu,

    1. National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement and National Centre of Crop Molecular Breeding, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China
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  • Mingxing Cheng,

    1. National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement and National Centre of Crop Molecular Breeding, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China
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  • Guanjun Gao,

    1. National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement and National Centre of Crop Molecular Breeding, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China
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  • Qinglu Zhang,

    1. National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement and National Centre of Crop Molecular Breeding, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China
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  • Jinghua Xiao,

    1. National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement and National Centre of Crop Molecular Breeding, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China
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  • Yuqing He

    Corresponding author
    • National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement and National Centre of Crop Molecular Breeding, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China
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Correspondence to: Yuqing He, National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic

Improvement and National Centre of Crop Molecular Breeding, Huazhong

Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China. E-mail: yqhe@mail.hzau.edu.cn

Abstract

Background

Brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens Stål, is the most devastating insect pest in rice-producing areas. Three dominant BPH resistance genes (Bph14, Bph15, Bph18) were pyramided into elite indica rice 9311 and its hybrids using marker-assisted selection. Gene effectiveness was evaluated on the basis of seedling and adult rice resistance, honeydew weight and survival rate of BPH.

Results

All three genes affected BPH growth and development and antibiotic factors, resulting in both seedling and adult resistance. Bph15 had the greatest effect on conferring resistance to BPH. The results showed an additive effect of pyramiding genes, the order of the gene effect being 14/15/18 ≥ 14/15 > 15/18 ≥ 15 > 14/18 ≥ 14 ≥ 18 > none. The pyramided or single-gene introgression hybrids showed greater resistance than conventional hybrids, although the heterozygous genotypes had weaker effects than the corresponding homozygous genotypes. Furthermore, field trial data demonstrated that yields of improved 9311 lines were higher than or similar to that of the control under natural field conditions. These improved versions can be immediately used in hybrid improvement and production.

Conclusion

Compared with controls, pyramided lines and hybrids with three genes showed the strongest resistance to BPH, without a yield decrease. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry

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