Involvement of superoxide dismutase in oxidative stress in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis: molecular cloning and expression profiles

Authors

  • Xue-Meng Gao,

    1. Key Laboratory of Entomology and Pest Control Engineering, College of Plant Protection, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China
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  • Fu-Xian Jia,

    1. Key Laboratory of Entomology and Pest Control Engineering, College of Plant Protection, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China
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  • Guang-Mao Shen,

    1. Key Laboratory of Entomology and Pest Control Engineering, College of Plant Protection, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China
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  • Hua-Qin Jiang,

    1. Key Laboratory of Entomology and Pest Control Engineering, College of Plant Protection, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China
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  • Wei Dou,

    1. Key Laboratory of Entomology and Pest Control Engineering, College of Plant Protection, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China
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  • Jin-Jun Wang

    Corresponding author
    1. Key Laboratory of Entomology and Pest Control Engineering, College of Plant Protection, Southwest University, Chongqing, PR China
    • Correspondence to: Jin-Jun Wang, Key Laboratory of Entomology and Pest Control Engineering, College of Plant Protection, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, PR China. E-mail: jjwang7008@yahoo.com

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Abstract

Background

Bactrocera dorsalis, one of the most economically important fruit fly pests in East Asia, is well adapted to various environmental conditions. Pesticides, pathogens and other stresses can cause oxidative damage in most organisms. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) family contains some of the most important enzymes in the antioxidant protection system of the fruit fly and other organisms.

Results

Four full-length cDNA sequences encoding one MnSOD (BdSOD2-1) and three Cu–ZnSODs (BdSOD1-1, BdSOD1-2 and BdSOD1-3) were cloned. The expression profiles of these four genes under different stresses showed them to be involved in response to detrimental conditions including heavy metals, pesticides, extreme temperatures and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stresses. More specifically, the expression levels of these genes were found to be depressed in the presence of copper, zinc and manganese. The expression of all four SOD genes increased upon exposure to lead, cadmium, low temperature (0 °C) and LPS stresses. Only BdSOD1-3 transcription increased significantly at high temperature (40 °C) exposure. The expressions levels of BdSOD1-2 and BdSOD1-3 increased significantly in the presence of β-cypermethrin and malathion, but only the expression of BdSOD2-1 increased in the presence of avermectin treatment.

Conclusion

These different expression profiles suggest that the four BdSODs play different roles and respond to different oxidative stresses in B. dorsalis. Some BdSODs undergo specific reaction in the response to specific oxidative stresses. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry

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