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Transport properties of the mung bean (Vigna radiata) non-aerial hypocotyl membrane: permselectivity to hydrophilic compounds

Authors

  • John Aponte,

    Corresponding author
    1. Faculty of Natural Sciences, Leibniz University of Hannover, Hannover, Germany
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  • Peter Baur

    1. Faculty of Natural Sciences, Leibniz University of Hannover, Hannover, Germany
    2. Formulation Technology, Bayer CropScience, Monheim/Frankfurt, Germany
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    • Current address: Global Application Development, Clariant Industrial & Consumer Specialities, Frankfurt, Germany.


Abstract

Background

Aerial plant surfaces are covered by a lipophilic cuticular membrane (CM) that restricts the transport of water and small solutes. Non-aerial tissues do not exhibit such a barrier. Recent data have shown that large relative to CM hydrophilic agrochemicals were able to pass at high rates through the non-aerial coleoptile.

Results

A moderately large hydrophilic solute like PEG 1000 with a mean molar volume of 782 cm3 mol−1 was rejected by the non-aerial hypocotyl. Uptake of smaller solutes like urea (46.5 cm3 mol−1) was fast and with 99% after 1 day. Cut-off size estimations suggest a pore size diameter below 1.5 nm.

Conclusion

Aerial and non-aerial CM differ largely in their absolute barrier properties. This difference is related to the absence of embedded cuticular waxes in the non-aerial hypocotyl membrane, which make the CM physically dense and cause low solubility of hydrophilic solutes. The free volume for diffusion at the interface of the non-aerial hypocotyl cuticle to the environment is much larger resulting in higher penetration rates. It is suggested that diffusion through the non-aerial hypocotyl does not proceed in a real channel system with continuous aqueous phase but is more like transport through a filter with restricted diffusion in the pore openings. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry

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