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Indigenous American species of the Bemisia tabaci complex are still widespread in the Americas

Authors

  • Leonardo da F Barbosa,

    1. UNESP – Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas, Botucatu, Brazil
    2. Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterránea ‘La Mayora’ – Universidad de Málaga – Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IHSM-UMA-CSIC), Algarrobo-Costa, Málaga, Spain
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  • Julio M Marubayashi,

    1. UNESP – Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas, Botucatu, Brazil
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  • Bruno R De Marchi,

    1. UNESP – Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas, Botucatu, Brazil
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  • Valdir A Yuki,

    1. Instituto Agronômico de Campinas, Centro de Fitossanidade, Campinas, Brazil
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  • Marcelo A Pavan,

    1. UNESP – Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas, Botucatu, Brazil
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  • Enrique Moriones,

    1. Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterránea ‘La Mayora’ – Universidad de Málaga – Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IHSM-UMA-CSIC), Algarrobo-Costa, Málaga, Spain
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  • Jesús Navas-Castillo,

    1. Instituto de Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterránea ‘La Mayora’ – Universidad de Málaga – Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IHSM-UMA-CSIC), Algarrobo-Costa, Málaga, Spain
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  • Renate Krause-Sakate

    Corresponding author
    1. UNESP – Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas, Botucatu, Brazil
    • Correspondence to: Renate Krause-Sakate, UNESP – Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas, Botucatu, Brazil. E-mail: renatekrause@fca.unesp.br

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Abstract

Bemisia tabaci is a complex of at least 36 putative cryptic species. Since the late 1980s, the Middle East–Asia Minor 1 species (MEAM1, formerly known as the B biotype), has emerged in many tropical and subtropical regions of the world and in some areas has displaced the indigenous populations of B. tabaci. Based on analysis of the mtCOI gene, two indigenous species native to America have been reported: New World (NW, formerly the A biotype) and New World 2 (NW2). NW is present at least in Argentina, Brazil, Martinique, Mexico, Texas and Venezuela, and NW2 in Argentina, Bolivia and Brazil. Wild plants (Euphorbia sp. and Ipomoea sp.), as well as important crops such as tomato, bean and cotton, are still hosts for native B. tabaci populations in the Americas. MEAM1 has not completely displaced the native B. tabaci from the Americas. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry

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