Journal of Peptide Science

Cover image for Vol. 19 Issue 7

July 2013

Volume 19, Issue 7

Pages 393–459

  1. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Research Articles
    4. Corrigendum
    1. Joseph Rudinger memorial lecture: Discovery and applications of cyclotides (pages 393–407)

      David J Craik

      Article first published online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/psc.2523

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Structure of a cyclotide shown on the background of a Violaceae plant (Viola tricolor) that is a common source of cyclotides. Cyclotides are expressed in the leaf, flowers, and stems of plants and are thought to be present for host defense purposes. Their characteristic cyclic cystine knot motif, comprising a head-to-tail cyclic backbone and a knotted arrangement of three disulfide bonds makes them exceptionally stable.

    2. COMU: scope and limitations of the latest innovation in peptide acyl transfer reagents (pages 408–414)

      Ramon Subirós-Funosas, Lidia Nieto-Rodriguez, Knud J. Jensen and Fernando Albericio

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/psc.2517

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nowadays there is a continuous renovation in the methodology for peptide bond formation. COMU as uronium salt derivate from Oxyma scaffold has improved the coupling efficiency in comparison with classic benzotriazole-based reagents (HATU, HBTU, HCTU, TBTU). Nevertheless, there is still room of improvement in the performance of COMU, in example the stability of commercial batches in solution, which hampers the compatibility with automated synthesis.

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Research Articles
    4. Corrigendum
    1. Nucleobase-caged peptide nucleic acids: PNA/PNA duplex destabilization and light-triggered PNA/PNA recognition (pages 415–422)

      Samit Guha, Julia Graf, Björn Göricke and Ulf Diederichsen

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/psc.2514

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The 2-(o-nitrophenyl)-propyl caging group is used to mask adenine and cytosine in group is used to mask adenine and cytosine in (PNA). The stability of PNA/PNA double strand formation can be modulated by number and positioning of caging groups. By removal of the nucleobase caging group at 365 nm, the PNA/PNA duplex stability can be restored.

    2. Stabilisation of a short α-helical VIP fragment by side chain to side chain cyclisation: a comparison of common cyclisation motifs by circular dichroism (pages 423–432)

      Lukasz Frankiewicz, Cecilia Betti, Karel Guillemyn, Dirk Tourwé, Yves Jacquot and Steven Ballet

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/psc.2515

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The effect of three classical macrocyclisation techniques (i.e. lactamisation, ring-closing metathesis and Huisgen cycloaddition) on inducing an alfa-helical conformation in short peptide fragments was investigated using a model octapeptide segment derived from vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP).The conformations of the resulting cyclic peptides were compared by CD analysis. Based on this analysis, the triazole-tethered peptide after azide-alkyne CuAAC macrocyclisation shows a higher folding propensity in comparison with the two other cyclization methods.

    3. Peptides and peptidoaldehydes as substrates for the Pictet–Spengler reaction (pages 433–440)

      Karolina Pulka, Marta Slupska, Anna Puszko, Maria Misiak, Marcin Wilczek, Wiktor Kozminski and Aleksandra Misicka

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/psc.2516

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The PS reaction as a chemical ligation method was investigated. It was found that peptides with N-terminal tryptophan may be used as substrates for this condensation. On the other hand, the utility of peptidoaldehydes as substrates for the PS reaction is reduced by the side formation of enamides which decrease the yield of cyclization.

    4. T-cell epitope-dependent immune response in inbred (C57BL/6J, SJL/J, and C3H/HeN) and transgenic P301S and Tg2576 mice (pages 441–451)

      Monique Richter, Ralf Hoffmann and David Singer

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/psc.2518

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Immunogenic properties of three AD-specific B-cell epitopes (Tau229–237[pT231/pS235], pyroGluAβ3–8, and Aβ37/38–42/43) fused to five foreign T-cell epitopes (MVFP, TT, TBC Ag85B, PvT19, and PvT53) were evaluated by immunizing inbred C57BL/6J (H-2b), SJL/J (H-2s2), and C3H/HeN (H-2k) mice. Afterwards, two transgenic mouse models of AD, P301S (H-2b/k) and Tg2576 (H-2b/s) animals, were immunized with the two most promising peptide vaccines. Immunization yielded high antigen-specific IgG titers with preferred IgG1 in P301S mice and balanced IgG1 and IgG2 in Tg2576 mice.

    5. Conformation of gramicidin A in Triton X-100 micelles from CD and FTIR data: a clean example of antiparallel double β5.6 helix formation (pages 452–458)

      Sergei V. Sychev, Leonid I. Barsukov and Vadim T. Ivanov

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/psc.2519

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymorphic channel-formic peptide gramicidin A was studied by CD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy in micelles of Triton X-100. The results show that only one thermodynamically stable structure, antiparallel left-handed double helix β5.6, is formed in this membrane-mimetic environment.

  3. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Reviews
    3. Research Articles
    4. Corrigendum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum to “Discovery and characterization of Coturnix chinensis avian β-defensin 10, with broad antibacterial activity”. J. Pept. Sci. 2012; 18: 224–232 (page 459)

      Deying Ma, Lijuan Lin, Kexin Zhang, Zongxi Han, Yuhao Shao, Ruiqin Wang and Shengwang Liu

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/psc.2521

      This article corrects:

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION