Reduced graphene oxide micropatterns as an interface for adherent cells

Authors

  • Lotta E. Delle,

    1. Department of Informatics and Microsystem Technology, University of Applied Sciences Kaiserslautern, Amerikastr. 1, 66482 Zweibrücken, Germany
    2. Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium
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  • Ruben Lanche,

    1. Department of Informatics and Microsystem Technology, University of Applied Sciences Kaiserslautern, Amerikastr. 1, 66482 Zweibrücken, Germany
    2. Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium
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  • Jessica Ka-Yan Law,

    1. Department of Informatics and Microsystem Technology, University of Applied Sciences Kaiserslautern, Amerikastr. 1, 66482 Zweibrücken, Germany
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  • Maryam Weil,

    1. Department of Informatics and Microsystem Technology, University of Applied Sciences Kaiserslautern, Amerikastr. 1, 66482 Zweibrücken, Germany
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  • Xuan Thang Vu,

    1. Department of Informatics and Microsystem Technology, University of Applied Sciences Kaiserslautern, Amerikastr. 1, 66482 Zweibrücken, Germany
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  • Patrick Wagner,

    1. Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, 3590 Diepenbeek, Belgium
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  • Sven Ingebrandt

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Informatics and Microsystem Technology, University of Applied Sciences Kaiserslautern, Amerikastr. 1, 66482 Zweibrücken, Germany
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Abstract

In the present study, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is used as a biointerface for the investigation of cell adhesion of human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells. A fast, straightforward, and substrate-independent soft lithography approach known as “Micromolding In Capillaries” (MIMIC) was utilized to pattern graphene oxide (GO) arrays. Large-scale GO patterns with widths and distances in the micrometer range were obtained and were subsequently reduced to rGO via an environmentally-friendly procedure using L-ascorbic acid. Physical characterization of rGO patterns and cells was performed by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Impedance spectroscopy was used for the electrochemical characterization of GO before and after reduction. Cell adhesion and alignment was strong on the rGO micropatterns. In future assays, the rGO could combine two functions: cellular patterning and electrical interfacing of cells. pssa201200864-gra-0001

HEK 293 cells aligning on rGO micro patterns (SEM image)

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