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Dielectric properties of Ga2O3-doped barium iron niobate ceramics

Authors

  • Kachaporn Sanjoom,

    1. Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
    2. Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, Bangkok, Thailand
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  • Kamonpan Pengpat,

    1. Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
    2. Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
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  • Sukum Eitssayeam,

    1. Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
    2. Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
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  • Tawee Tunkasiri,

    1. Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
    2. Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
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  • Gobwute Rujijanagul

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
    2. Materials Science Research Center, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
    3. Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, Bangkok, Thailand
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Abstract

Ga-doped BaFe0.5Nb0.5O3 (Ba(Fe1–xGax)0.5Nb0.5O3) ceramics were fabricated and their properties were investigated. All ceramics showed perovskite structure with cubic symmetry and the solubility of Ga in BFN ceramics had a limit at x = 0.2. Examination of the dielectric spectra indicated that all ceramic samples presented high dielectric constants that were frequency dependent. The x = 0.2 ceramic showed a very high dielectric constant (ϵr > 240 000 at 1 kHz) while the x = 0.4 sample exhibited high thermal stability of dielectric constant with low loss tangent from room temperature (RT) to 100 °C with ϵr > 28 000 (at 1 kHz) when compared to other samples. By using a complex impedance analysis technique, bulk grain, grain boundary, and electrode response were found to affect the dielectric behavior that could be related to the Maxwell–Wagner polarization mechanism

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