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Low-temperature encapsulation of coronene in carbon nanotubes

Authors

  • B. Botka,

    Corresponding author
    1. Walther-Meissner-Institute, Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Walther-Meissner-Strasse 8, 85748 Garching, Germany
    2. Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest, Hungary
    • Phone: +49 89 28914224, Fax: +49 89 28914206
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  • M. E. Füstös,

    1. Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest, Hungary
    2. Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babeş-Bolyai University, Arany János Str. 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
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  • G. Klupp,

    1. Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest, Hungary
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  • D. Kocsis,

    1. Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest, Hungary
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  • E. Székely,

    1. Department of Chemical and Environmental Process Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest, Hungary
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  • M. Utczás,

    1. Department of Chemical and Environmental Process Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest, Hungary
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  • B. Simándi,

    1. Department of Chemical and Environmental Process Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest, Hungary
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  • Á. Botos,

    1. Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest, Hungary
    2. School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK
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  • R. Hackl,

    1. Walther-Meissner-Institute, Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Walther-Meissner-Strasse 8, 85748 Garching, Germany
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  • K. Kamarás

    1. Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest, Hungary
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Abstract

Coronene was encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) by vapor-phase filling at high (450 °C) and low (385 °C) temperature and by nanoextraction from supercritical carbon dioxide. The presence of coronene inside the tubes was demonstrated indirectly via the formation of double-walled nanotubes (DWNT). To this end several subsequent annealing steps were applied and monitored by Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that the encapsulation is successful with all three methods. However, high-temperature vapor filling produces adsorbed dicoronylene, the dimerized form of coronene, as a side reaction. In order to avoid dicoronylene contamination, we suggest to use low-temperature methods for the production of coronene-filled carbon nanotubes.

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Coronene (top) and dicoronylene (bottom) molecules.

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