physica status solidi (RRL) - Rapid Research Letters

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 9

September 2011

Volume 5, Issue 9

Pages A93–A102, 301–358

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Back Cover
    5. Contents
    6. NEW IN pss
    7. Conference calendar
    8. Review@RRL
    9. Preface
    10. Expert Opinion
    11. Rapid Research Letters
    12. Information for authors
    1. Cover Picture: From metal/semiconductor separation to single-chirality separation of single-wall carbon nanotubes using gel (Phys. Status Solidi RRL 9/2011)

      Takeshi Tanaka, Huaping Liu, Shunjiro Fujii and Hiromichi Kataura

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201190020

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      For the electrical application of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with superior electrical, mechanical, and chemical properties, the separation of metallic/semiconducting SWCNTs and a structural (also called “chirality”) separation of SWCNTs are required because general SWCNT production methods afford a mixture of various types of SWCNTs. The novel separation methods using polysaccharide gels reviewed by Takeshi Tanaka et al. (see their “Review@RRL” article on pp. 301–306), provide not only metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs but also single-chirality SWCNTs exhibiting beautiful colors and enable one easily to obtain these separated SWCNTs with high yield and high throughput at low cost. The background in the cover image indicates the separation model: semiconducting SWCNTs (green) are selectively adsorbed to the gel framework (yellow network), while metallic SWCNTs (blue) fully covered with surfactant molecules (red balls and sticks) remain in a solution phase as micelles.

  2. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Back Cover
    5. Contents
    6. NEW IN pss
    7. Conference calendar
    8. Review@RRL
    9. Preface
    10. Expert Opinion
    11. Rapid Research Letters
    12. Information for authors
  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Back Cover
    5. Contents
    6. NEW IN pss
    7. Conference calendar
    8. Review@RRL
    9. Preface
    10. Expert Opinion
    11. Rapid Research Letters
    12. Information for authors
    1. Back Cover: Focus on Sustainable Electronics (Phys. Status Solidi RRL 9/2011)

      Peter J. Klar and Bruno K. Meyer

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201190022

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Today’s society uses up to 35 tons of material per capita and year for basic needs, luxury or consumer goods, hightech products, etc. The functioning of highly specialised electronic devices depends on the systematic incorporation of different chemical elements into the materials comprising the device. However, the abundance of the individual chemical elements varies by orders of magnitude and, furthermore, they are not evenly distributed on the Earth's surface. Do we have enough resources for our current and future needs? Which are possible strategies to cope with the problem of scarcity and related issues? These questions are addressed in the “Focus on Sustainable Electronics” (pp. 307–339 in this issue), guest-edited by Peter J. Klar and Bruno K. Meyer.

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Back Cover
    5. Contents
    6. NEW IN pss
    7. Conference calendar
    8. Review@RRL
    9. Preface
    10. Expert Opinion
    11. Rapid Research Letters
    12. Information for authors
  5. NEW IN pss

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Back Cover
    5. Contents
    6. NEW IN pss
    7. Conference calendar
    8. Review@RRL
    9. Preface
    10. Expert Opinion
    11. Rapid Research Letters
    12. Information for authors
  6. Conference calendar

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Back Cover
    5. Contents
    6. NEW IN pss
    7. Conference calendar
    8. Review@RRL
    9. Preface
    10. Expert Opinion
    11. Rapid Research Letters
    12. Information for authors
  7. Review@RRL

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Back Cover
    5. Contents
    6. NEW IN pss
    7. Conference calendar
    8. Review@RRL
    9. Preface
    10. Expert Opinion
    11. Rapid Research Letters
    12. Information for authors
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      From metal/semiconductor separation to single-chirality separation of single-wall carbon nanotubes using gel (pages 301–306)

      Takeshi Tanaka, Huaping Liu, Shunjiro Fujii and Hiromichi Kataura

      Version of Record online: 5 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105289

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The conventional syntheses of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) always afford mixtures of metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs, and separation of these two types remains the most critical obstacle preventing their electronic application. In this Review, the authors show a development of novel separation methods using polysaccharide gels for metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs, and further for mono-structured (i.e. single chirality) SWCNTs. The separation mechanism by selective adsorption and future directions are also discussed.

  8. Preface

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Back Cover
    5. Contents
    6. NEW IN pss
    7. Conference calendar
    8. Review@RRL
    9. Preface
    10. Expert Opinion
    11. Rapid Research Letters
    12. Information for authors
    1. Focus on Sustainable Electronics

      You have free access to this content
      Preface – Focus on Sustainable Electronics (pages 307–308)

      Peter J. Klar and Bruno K. Meyer

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201150335

  9. Expert Opinion

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Back Cover
    5. Contents
    6. NEW IN pss
    7. Conference calendar
    8. Review@RRL
    9. Preface
    10. Expert Opinion
    11. Rapid Research Letters
    12. Information for authors
    1. Focus on Sustainable Electronics

      Criticality of metal resources for functional materials used in electronics and microelectronics (pages 309–311)

      Armin Reller

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105126

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      In modern electronic devices like cell phones or computers an enormous diversity of functional materials interact successfully. Many of the mineral resources for these materials, in particular the metals, are indispensable, but at the same time scarce. Here, a criticality concept is presented which allows us to foresee and to validate supply risks.

    2. A life cycle framework for the investigation of environmentally benign nanoparticles and products (pages 312–317)

      Thomas L. Theis, Bhavik R. Bakshi, Delcie Durham, Vasilis M. Fthenakis, Timothy G. Gutowski, Jacqueline A. Isaacs, Thomas Seager and Mark R. Wiesner

      Version of Record online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105083

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      Life cycle analysis is proposed as a tool for investigating the sustainability of nanostructured materials, and evaluating the tradeoffs associated with the development of different types of nano-based products. An interdisciplinary approach to research devoted to the identification, investigation, synthesis, testing, and analysis of groups of new, more environmentally conscious nanoparticles and products is needed.

    3. Sustainability and renewable energies – a critical look at photovoltaics (pages 318–323)

      B. K. Meyer and P. J. Klar

      Version of Record online: 10 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105366

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The current status of photovoltaic modules from wafer-based Si and thin films of Si, CuInGaSe2 (CIGS), CdTe and III–V compound semiconductors in terms of efficiencies and market volumes is shortly summarized and evaluated with respect to sustainability; critical raw materials assuming a 100 GW per year production level are identified, alternative materials on the horizon are discussed.

    4. Thermoelectric materials – Compromising between high efficiency and materials abundance (pages 324–331)

      G. Homm and P. J. Klar

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105084

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      The main field of application of thermoelectric (TE) devices is energy harvesting from heat originating in the energy conversion processes of fossil fuels or solar radiation. Thus, thermoelectrics enhances the efficiency of these processes and may contribute to the solution of the world's energy problem. The possible applications of TE devices range from highly specialized devices to mass products. The selection of the suitable materials for a TE device depends on a range of criteria where next to efficiency, price, and environmental aspects the availability of the used material is very important. In particular, in case of mass products, scarcity of materials may become a limitation.

    5. Electronics with and on paper (pages 332–335)

      R. Martins, I. Ferreira and E. Fortunato

      Version of Record online: 1 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105247

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      The autors have studied the dominant internal noise sources of magnetoelectric laminate sensors. They theoretically estimated the values of the noise sources and experimentally confirmed these values. For longitudinally magnetized and thickness polarized mode (L–T mode) Metglas/PMN–PT sensors, the DC resistance noise dominates the equivalent magnetic noise at low frequencies, while the dielectric loss noise is the principal contribution above 2.5 Hz. Overall, the equivalent magnetic noise of the complete sensor unit was as small as 10.8 pT/Hz at f = 1 Hz.

    6. Where science fiction meets reality? With oxide semiconductors! (pages 336–339)

      E. Fortunato and R. Martins

      Version of Record online: 24 JUN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105246

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Transparent electronics has arrived and is contributing for generating a “free real estate” electronics that is able to add new electronic functionalities onto surfaces, which currently are not used in this manner and where silicon cannot compete. High performance p-type oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) on glass substrates using a reactive sputter deposited SnOx channel layer have been fabricated with a typical saturation mobility of 4.6 cm2V–1s–1 and an on–off ratio of 7×104, which are the highest values achieved so far for p-channel oxide TFTs. This breakthrough will enable the production of fully transparent complementary metal oxide semiconductor devices associated with all the main advantages offered by transparent/oxide electronics.

  10. Rapid Research Letters

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Back Cover
    5. Contents
    6. NEW IN pss
    7. Conference calendar
    8. Review@RRL
    9. Preface
    10. Expert Opinion
    11. Rapid Research Letters
    12. Information for authors
    1. Hafnia nanoparticles – a model system for graphene growth on a dielectric (pages 341–343)

      Piran R. Kidambi, Bernhard C. Bayer, Robert S. Weatherup, Rolf Ochs, Caterina Ducati, D. Vinga Szabó and Stephan Hofmann

      Version of Record online: 27 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201100155

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graphene growth on hafnia (HfO2) nanoparticles by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is studied. It is found that monoclinic HfO2 nanoparticles neither reduce to a metal nor form a carbide while nucleating nanometer domain-sized few layer graphene. Hence the authors of this Letter regard this as an interesting non-metallic catalyst model system with the potential to explore graphene growth directly on a (high-k) dielectric.

    2. Integrated waveguide sensor utilizing organic photodiodes (pages 344–346)

      Bernhard Lamprecht, Elke Kraker, Martin Sagmeister, Stefan Köstler, Nicole Galler, Harald Ditlbacher, Birgit Ungerböck, Tobias Abel and Torsten Mayr

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105300

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel optical sensor platform is presented, combining monolithically integrated ring-like sensor waveguides together with ring-shaped thin-film organic photodiodes (OPDs) on one substrate. The waveguide structures, including a means of coupling light in and out of the waveguides, serve as sensing elements. The functionality of the concept is demonstrated by a carbon dioxide sensor, utilizing absorbance as the sensing principle.

    3. An arrayed nanoantenna for broadband light emission and detection (pages 347–349)

      Andrey E. Miroshnichenko, Ivan S. Maksymov, Arthur R. Davoyan, Constantin Simovski, Pavel Belov and Yuri S. Kivshar

      Version of Record online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105350

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The radiation of a quantum emitter can be strongly enhanced and highly directed by coupling to optical nanoantennas. Yagi–Uda-like architectures bring considerable advantages such as high antenna gain and directionality, but suffer from a very narrowband performance. By using an arrayed optical nanoantenna consisting of plasmonic nanorods of gradually varying length the bandwidth can be drastically increased up to 25%.

    4. Scaling effect of flexoelectric (Ba,Sr)TiO3 microcantilevers (pages 350–352)

      Wenbin Huang, Kyungrim Kim, Shujun Zhang, Fuh-Gwo Yuan and Xiaoning Jiang

      Version of Record online: 4 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105326

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      In this Letter the authors report the fabrication and flexoelectric measurement of Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3 ceramic microcantilevers with thicknesses down to micrometers. The authors study the flexoelectric coefficient of the microcantilevers and investigate the scaling effect of the effective piezoelectric properties induced by flexoelectricity which holds great potential for microcantilever sensing applications.

    5. Free standing modulation doped core–shell GaAs/AlGaAs hetero-nanowires (pages 353–355)

      Dance Spirkoska, Anna Fontcuberta i Morral, Joseph Dufouleur, Qiushi Xie and Gerhard Abstreiter

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105338

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      In this Letter, Spirkoska et al. show that one can successfully transfer the knowledge of conventional modulation doping of planar GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures to core-shell GaAs/AlGaAs heteronanowires. This enables formation of two-dimensional electron systems on the side facets of the nanowires arranged in a hexagonal geometry. This work opens the route towards the achievement of high electron mobility nanowire transistors.

    6. In-situ X-ray diffraction study of an electric field induced phase transition and giant strain in Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3x %BaTiO3 lead-free single crystals (pages 356–358)

      Wenwei Ge, Qinhui Zhang, Zhiguang Wang, Jianjun Yao, Jiefang Li, Haosu Luo and D. Viehland

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/pssr.201105280

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors performed electric field induced strain and in-situ X-ray diffraction measurements on 〈001〉-oriented lead-free piezoelectric Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3–5.6%BaTiO3 single crystals under an electric field of 20 kV/cm. A reversible giant electric field induced strain of 0.60% has been observed at 130 °C. XRD revealed that the induced strain resulted from the phase transition between pseudocubic and tetragonal structures.

  11. Information for authors

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Issue Information
    4. Back Cover
    5. Contents
    6. NEW IN pss
    7. Conference calendar
    8. Review@RRL
    9. Preface
    10. Expert Opinion
    11. Rapid Research Letters
    12. Information for authors

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