Effects of Sinensetin on Lipid Metabolism in Mature 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

Authors

  • Seong-Il Kang,

    1. Department of Biology, Jeju National University, Jejusi, Jeju Special Self-Governing Province, Korea
    2. Jeju Sasa Industry Development Agency, Jeju National University, Jeju-si, Jeju Special Self-Governing Province, Korea
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  • Hye-Sun Shin,

    1. Department of Biology, Jeju National University, Jejusi, Jeju Special Self-Governing Province, Korea
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  • Hee-Chul Ko,

    1. Jeju Sasa Industry Development Agency, Jeju National University, Jeju-si, Jeju Special Self-Governing Province, Korea
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  • Se-Jae Kim

    Corresponding author
    1. Jeju Sasa Industry Development Agency, Jeju National University, Jeju-si, Jeju Special Self-Governing Province, Korea
    • Department of Biology, Jeju National University, Jejusi, Jeju Special Self-Governing Province, Korea
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Se-Jae Kim, Department of Biology, Jeju National University, 102 Jejudaehakno, Jejusi, Jeju Special Self-Governing Province 690-756, Korea.

E-mail: sjkim@jejunu.ac.kr

Abstract

Sinensetin is a rare polymethoxylated flavone found in certain citrus fruits. In this study, we investigated the effects of sinensetin on lipid metabolism in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Sinensetin decreased the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), suggesting its antiadipogeneic property via downreguation of SREBP1c. Also, sinensetin increased the phosphorylation of protein kinase A and hormone-sensitive lipase, indicating its lipolytic property via a cAMP-mediated signaling pathway. Moreover, sinensetin inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by decreasing the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate and Akt. Furthermore, sinensetin increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. It also upregulated mRNA expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1a, suggesting that sinensetin enhances fatty acid β-oxidation through the AMPK pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that sinensetin may have potential as a natural agent for prevention/improvement of obesity. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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