The Anti-Angiogenic Activities of Glycyrrhizic Acid in Tumor Progression

Authors

  • Kil-Jung Kim,

    1. Department of Biomedical Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea
    2. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Biomedical Science Institute, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These authors equally contributed to this work.
  • Jae-Sun Choi,

    1. Department of Biomedical Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea
    2. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Biomedical Science Institute, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These authors equally contributed to this work.
  • Kyu-Won Kim,

    1. NeuroVascular Coordination Research Center, College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    2. Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Joo-Won Jeong

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biomedical Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea
    • Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Biomedical Science Institute, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondence to: Dr Joo-Won Jeong, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Hoegidong #1, Dongdaemoongu, Seoul 130–701, Korea.

E-mail: jjeong@khu.ac.kr

Abstract

Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) is the bioactive compound of licorice and has been used as a herbal medicine because of its anti-viral, anti-cancer, and anti-inflammatory properties. This study was designed to investigate the effects of GA on tumor growth, angiogenesis, and the mechanisms underlying the anti-angiogenic activities of GA. We observed that GA inhibited tumor growth and angiogenesis in mice. GA decreased angiogenic activities, such as the migration, invasion, and tube formation of endothelial cells. We also demonstrated that GA reduced the production of reactive oxygen species and activation of ERK in endothelial cells. Our findings suggest that GA is a promising anti-angiogenic therapeutic agent that targets the ERK pathway. Considering that angiogenesis is highly stimulated in the majority of cancers, GA could offer a potent therapeutic agent for cancer. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Ancillary