Packaging Technology and Science

Cover image for Vol. 28 Issue 6

June 2015

Volume 28, Issue 6

Pages 475–564

  1. Review Article

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Article
    3. Research Articles
    4. Short Communication
    1. The Potential of NanoCellulose in the Packaging Field: A Review (pages 475–508)

      Fei Li, Erika Mascheroni and Luciano Piergiovanni

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2121

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A 1.5 µm thick coating on (a) a polyethylene terephthalate film, (b) made of cellulose nanocrystals and (c) obtained by acidic hydrolysis of cotton linters.

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Article
    3. Research Articles
    4. Short Communication
    1. A Comparison of the Migration of ‘Spiked’ and ‘Intrinsic’ Substances from Paper and Board into Raisins and into Tenax as a Food Simulant (pages 509–517)

      E. L. Bradley, L. Castle and D. R. Speck

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2117

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chemical migration was studied from paper and board into raisins (as a typical dried preserved fruit) and into the simulant Tenax. The test results using Tenax are considered to be appropriate without application of a correction factor. There was evidence that substances intrinsic to the P/B sample (i.e., DiPN and DiBP) migrated less readilly than these substances ‘spiked in’.

    2. Impact of Production and Conversion Processes on the Carbon Footprint of Flexible Plastic Films (pages 519–528)

      Ngamtip Poovarodom, Chularat Ponnak and Natthaphon Manatphrom

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2118

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Film production and conversion processes greatly contribute to the total carbon footprint of plastic films, ranging from 16% to 40%, depending on plastic type, printing area, and number of lamination layers. An empirical model is developed to help calculate the carbon footprint of polyolefin films of different thickness and structure in an affordable and less time-consuming manner.

    3. Proposition of a New Severity Analysis Based on ‘Shake’ Detection: Example of the Vatry Airport Tarmac (pages 529–544)

      Victor Huart, Jean-Charles Candore, Jean-Baptiste Nolot, Nicolas Krajka, Jérôme Pellot, Serge Odof and Damien Erre

      Article first published online: 26 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2119

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This study focuses on a transport phase that has not been studied in depth to date. Transportation operations on tarmacs include many handling and transportation machines, which are characterized by typical constraints that are often more stringent than airlift phase constraints. An important phenomenon is defined and analysed: the shake. In this study, acceleration distributions on the tarmac and road were analysed and compared. The following work shows comparisons of severity indicators and the hardness of tarmac phase during a trip.

    4. Migration Model of Toxic Metals from Ceramic Food Contact Materials into Acid Food (pages 545–556)

      Zhan-hua Dong, Li-xin Lu and Zhi-gang Liu

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2122

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The aims of the study were to investigate the kinetics of the leaching of lead and cadmium and to propose a mathematical model to simulate the migration of lead and cadmium from ceramic food contact materials into acid food simulants. The result of this study showed that the migration of lead and cadmium was a diffusion-controlled process. Moreover, the proposed model could be applied into the migration prediction of toxic metals from ceramic food packaging materials.

  3. Short Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Review Article
    3. Research Articles
    4. Short Communication
    1. Modified Atmosphere Packaging of Guava Fruit (pages 557–564)

      D. K. Antala, A. K. Varshney, P. R. Davara and V. P. Sangani

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2110

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fully matured fresh guava fruits were precooled and pretreated with fungicide. The fruits were packed in 25- and 50-µm LDPE bags with active MAP of three O2 concentrations and stored at 5 ± 1 and 10 ± 1 °C temperatures. Results revealed that guava fruits were stored up to 42 days with 9% O2 + 5% CO2 gas concentration in 50-µm LDPE bags at 10 °C storage temperature, retaining the highest score of physicochemical and sensory characteristics.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION