Packaging Technology and Science

Cover image for Vol. 29 Issue 2

February 2016

Volume 29, Issue 2

Pages 75–131

  1. Issue information - TOC

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information - TOC
    3. Issue information - Info Page
    4. Research Articles
    1. Issue information - TOC (page 75)

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2154

  2. Issue information - Info Page

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information - TOC
    3. Issue information - Info Page
    4. Research Articles
    1. Issue information - Info Page (page 76)

      Article first published online: 19 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2155

  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue information - TOC
    3. Issue information - Info Page
    4. Research Articles
    1. Biodegradable Protein-based Films and Their Properties: A Comparative Study (pages 77–90)

      Pimonpan Kaewprachu, Kazufumi Osako, Soottawat Benjakul, Wirongrong Tongdeesoontorn and Saroat Rawdkuen

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2183

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Different sources of protein-based films exhibited significant differences in their properties. The appearances of protein-based films were similar to polyvinyl chloride wrap film. Protein-based films can be used as an alternative for food packaging applications.

    2. Steel Packages 10 Years After Being Disposed as Litter in a Tropical Environment (pages 91–104)

      J. L. C. Santos, J. A. B. Gatti, S. T. Dantas and W. R. Santos

      Article first published online: 8 DEC 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2188

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper presents the estimated average time for the degradation of steel packaging for soybean oil, soft drink, tomato products and powdered milk when disposed as litter in four tropical environments: (a) buried in the ground; (b) on the ground at an industrial site; (c) on the seashore; and (d) immersed in a riverbed. PET bottles, DWI aluminium cans, laminated plastic bags and carton based multilayer packaging were used as control.

    3. Modelling and Thermal Analysis of Tray-layered Fruits inside Ventilated Packages during Forced-air Precooling (pages 105–119)

      Li-xin Lu, Xiu-qin Chen and Jun Wang

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2189

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this study, a transient mathematical model considering heat of respiration and evaporation was developed to predict the thermal response of tray-layered fruits in ventilated packages during forced-air precooling. Temperature fields of three variously distributed circle and oblong vents in three different patterns (spaced, paralleled and crossed stacking) were simulated. Experimental validations were performed, and good agreement was obtained considering the five vent conditions.

    4. Migration of 17 Photoinitiators from Printing Inks and Cardboard into Packaged Food – Results of a Belgian Market Survey (pages 121–131)

      K. Van Den Houwe, A. Van Heyst, C. Evrard, J. Van Loco, F. Bolle, F. Lynen and E. Van Hoeck

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/pts.2190

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In a Belgian market survey, at least one photoinitiator was found in 89% of dry food samples using a sensitive and reliable ultra-performance liquid chromatography in combination with tandem mass spectrometry method. Benzophenone, 2,2-dimethoxy-2-phenyl acetophenone and ethyl-4-dimethylaminobenzoate were the most frequent detected photoinitiators, showing the need for frequent screening of dry foodstuffs, especially near the expiration date because migration is a diffusion-controlled process.

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