An assessment of a mountain-wave parametrization scheme using satellite observations of stratospheric gravity waves

Authors

  • H. Wells,

    Corresponding author
    1. Met Office, Exeter, UK
    • Met Office, Fitzroy Road, Exeter, EX1 3PB, UK.
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    • The contributions of these authors were written in the course of their employment at the Met Office, UK, and are published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.

  • S. B. Vosper,

    1. Met Office, Exeter, UK
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    • The contributions of these authors were written in the course of their employment at the Met Office, UK, and are published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.

  • X. Yan

    1. Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Leicester, UK
    2. Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany
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Abstract

Gravity-wave-induced temperature fluctuations predicted by a mountain-wave parametrization scheme are compared with observed stratospheric temperature fluctuations from the High-Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) instrument. The focus of the study is on the southern Andes region during the month of August 2006. The comparison reveals that while the mean amplitude of temperature fluctuations predicted by the parametrization is broadly consistent with those observed by HIRDLS, there are significant differences for individual cases. Ray-tracing calculations performed for these cases suggest that these differences are likely to be associated with horizontal propagation of mountain waves, which is not represented by current column-based parametrization schemes. The results presented in this note suggest that this is a deficiency of mountain-wave parametrization schemes that may affect models at resolutions typical of both climate and numerical weather prediction modelling. Copyright © 2011 Royal Meteorological Society and British Crown Copyright, the Met Office

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