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Combining transmission geometry laser ablation and a non-contact continuous flow surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter for mass spectrometry based chemical imaging

Authors

  • Olga S. Ovchinnikova,

    1. Organic and Biological Mass Spectrometry Group, Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA
    2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA
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  • Vilmos Kertesz,

    1. Physics and Chemistry Department, Szechenyi Istvan University, Gyor, Hungary
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  • Gary J. Van Berkel

    Corresponding author
    1. Organic and Biological Mass Spectrometry Group, Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA
    2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA
    • G. J. Van Berkel, Organic and Biological Mass Spectrometry Group, Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831–6131, USA.

      E-mail: vanberkelgj@ornl.gov

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  • This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

Abstract

This paper describes the coupling of ambient pressure transmission geometry laser ablation with a liquid-phase sample collection into a continuous flow surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter for mass spectrometry based chemical imaging. The flow probe/emitter device was placed in close proximity to the surface to collect the sample plume produced by laser ablation. The sample collected was immediately aspirated into the probe and onto the electrospray emitter, ionized and detected with the mass spectrometer. Freehand drawn ink lines and letters and an inked fingerprint on microscope slides were analyzed. The circular laser ablation area was about 210 µm in diameter and under the conditions used in these experiments the spatial resolution, as determined by the size of the surface features distinguished in the chemical images, was about 100 µm. Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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