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RATIONALE

Veterinary drug residue analysis of meat and seafood products is an important part of national regulatory agency food safety programs to ensure that consumers are not exposed to potentially dangerous substances. Complex tissue matrices often require lengthy extraction and analysis procedures to identify improper animal drug treatment. Direct and rapid analysis mass spectrometry techniques have the potential to increase regulatory sample analysis speed by eliminating liquid chromatographic separation.

METHODS

Flumequine, oxolinic acid, and nalidixic acid were extracted from catfish, shrimp, and salmon using acidified acetonitrile. Extracts were concentrated, dried onto metal sample wells, then rapidly desorbed (6 s) with an infrared diode laser for analysis by laser diode thermal desorption atmospheric pressure chemical ionization with tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-MS/MS). Analysis was conducted in selected reaction monitoring mode using piromidic acid as internal standard.

RESULTS

Six-point calibration curves for each compound in extracted matrix were linear with r2 correlation greater than 0.99. The method was validated by analyzing 23 negative samples and 116 fortified samples at concentrations of 10, 20, 50, 100, and 600 ng/g. Average recoveries of fortified samples were greater than 77% with method detection levels ranging from 2 to 7 ng/g. Three product ion transitions were acquired per analyte to identify each residue.

CONCLUSIONS

A rapid method for quinolone analysis in fish muscle was developed using LDTD-MS/MS. The total analysis time was less than 30 s per sample; quinolone residues were detected below 10 ng/g and in most cases residue identity was confirmed. This represents the first application of LDTD to tissue extract analysis. Published 2012. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.