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Respirology Case Reports

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 1

September 2013

Volume 1, Issue 1

Pages i–iii, 1–22

  1. Issue Information

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Case Reports
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      Issue Information (pages i–iii)

      Version of Record online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/rcr2.19

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Case Reports
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
  3. Case Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Issue Information
    3. Editorial
    4. Case Reports
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with low molecular weight heparin (pages 2–4)

      Shinichi Hayashi, Shuichiro Maruoka, Yoshiko Nakagawa, Noriaki Takahashi and Shu Hashimoto

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/rcr2.3

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      Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) has a varied etiology, including anticoagulation drugs. There is conflicting evidence whether low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) has a low risk of bleeding complications compared to unfractionated heparin. We report here a case of DAH in a 74-year-old woman who was administered enoxaparin, a LMWH, after bilateral total knee arthroplasty.

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      Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis presenting with a pulmonary mass mimicking lung cancer (pages 5–7)

      Yohei Takeuchi, Toshihiro Shirai, Shogo Sakurai, Masashi Mikamo, Masato Fujii and Takafumi Suda

      Version of Record online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/rcr2.4

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      A patient with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis can present with a pulmonary mass mimicking lung cancer with an elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Serum CEA may be a useful marker to assess disease conditions and whether treatment is effective.

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      Pulmonary hypertension: Tortuous route to diagnosis (pages 8–9)

      Giovanna Riolo, Bader Al Ghamdi and Christine L. D'Arsigny

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/rcr2.5

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      A tortuous arteriovenous brachial fistula resulted in pulmonary hypertension. Right heart catheterization confirmed a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 85 mm Hg as a result of high cardiac output, 8.3 L/min.

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      Broad and heterogeneous vasculopathy in pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema with pulmonary hypertension (pages 10–13)

      Takahiro Sato, Ichizo Tsujino, Mishie Tanino, Hiroshi Ohira and Masaharu Nishimura

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/rcr2.7

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      The present paper presents the case of a 69-year-old man with CPFE and progressive PH. Autopsy demonstrated broad vasculopathy distributing from arteries through veins, which seemingly caused PH along with advanced hypoxia and low DLCO. Further, immunohistochemical examination indicated positive staining of the target protein of sildenafil and bosentan, explaining why the two agents were able to improve the pulmonary hemodynamics.

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      Severe, but manageable hypoxia caused by bronchospasm induced by bevacizumab (pages 14–16)

      Hirokazu Taniguchi, Tomoko Tsuchida, Yoichi Nakamura, Kohei Motoshima, Kosuke Mizoguchi and Shigeru Kohno

      Version of Record online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/rcr2.10

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      We have experienced grade 3 hypoxia caused by bevacizumab-induced bronchospasm in a patient with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. This bronchospasm was easily managed and could be prevented by the inhalation of bronchodilator.

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      Successful erlotinib rechallenge after both gefitinib- and erlotinib-induced interstitial lung diseases (pages 17–19)

      Nobuhito Arakawa, Akihiro Tsujita, Noriko Saito, Shigemi Ishikawa and Shoji Ohno

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/rcr2.12

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      The picture shows the gefitinib-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD) observed in the present case. After it improved, the patient was treated with erlotinib, which brought another ILD. After managing both ILDs, erlotinib was successfully rechallenged with concurrent glucocorticoid administration and with gradual increase of dosage.

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      Advanced right lung adenocarcinoma with ipsilateral breast metastasis (pages 20–22)

      Chong-Kin Liam, Yong-Kek Pang, Mau-Ern Poh, Ken-Siong Kow, Chee-Kuan Wong and Raymond Varughese

      Version of Record online: 2 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/rcr2.14

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      Breast metastases from non-small cell lung carcinoma are rarely reported. A 70-year-old female patient presented with a massive right-sided pleural effusion due to metastasis from a right lower lobe lung adenocarcinoma which was negative for activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocation. Twenty months after her initial presentation, she developed right breast metastasis when her disease progressed despite first- and second-line cytotoxic chemotherapy.

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