An active endoscopic robot based on wireless power transmission and electromagnetic localization

Authors

  • Hongwei Li,

    Corresponding author
    1. 820 Institute, Department of Instrument Science and Engineering, School of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China
    • 820 Institute, Department of Instrument Science and Engineering, School of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China.
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  • Guozheng Yan,

    1. 820 Institute, Department of Instrument Science and Engineering, School of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China
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  • Guanying Ma

    1. 820 Institute, Department of Instrument Science and Engineering, School of Electronic Information and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People's Republic of China
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  • This paper is under the supports of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (NO.30270485) and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (863) (NO.2006AA04Z368)

Abstract

Background

Conventional endoscopes have the disadvantages of causing pain to patients because of their large dimensions and allowing incomplete inspection because of their limited power.

Methods

An active inchworm-like endoscopic robot has been designed, which is based on electromagnetic localization and synthesis of magnetic field strength vectors.

Results

The efficiency of wireless power transmission can be kept above 0.9% when the power-receiving coil is at arbitrary position and orientation. The position error of localization is < 10 mm and the average error of orientation angle is 2° . When the robot moves through part of the porcine colon, images are transmitted outwards continuously at a speed of 30 fps and the temperature rise of the colon is < 1 °C. By simulation, the electromagnetic exposures to the human body are lower than international standards.

Conclusions

The endoscopic robot is a promising tool for use by doctors, although further experiments and improvements need to be done. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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