Estimation of environmental force for the haptic interface of robotic surgery

Authors

  • Hyoung Il Son,

    1. Department of Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These authors contributed equally to this study.

  • Tapomayukh Bhattacharjee,

    1. Cognitive Robotics Center, KIST, Seoul 136-791, Republic of Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These authors contributed equally to this study.

  • Doo Yong Lee

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701, Republic of Korea
    • Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, 335 Gwahangno Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-701, Republic of Korea.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background

The success of a telerobotic surgery system with haptic feedback requires accurate force-tracking and position-tracking capacity of the slave robot. The two-channel force-position control architecture is widely used in teleoperation systems with haptic feedback for its better force-tracking characteristics and superior position-tracking capacity for the maximum stability margin. This control architecture, however, requires force sensors at the end-effector of the slave robot to measure the environment force. However, it is difficult to attach force sensors to slave robots, mainly due to their large size, insulation issues and also large currents often flowing through the end-effector for incision or cautery of tissues.

Methods

This paper provides a method to estimate the environment force, using a function parameter matrix and a recursive least-squares method. The estimated force is used to feed back the force information to the surgeon through the control architecture without involving the force sensors.

Results

The simulation and experimental results verify the efficacy of the proposed method. The force estimation error is negligible and the slave device successfully tracks the position of the master device while the stability of the teleoperation system is maintained.

Conclusions

The developed method allows practical haptic feedback for telerobotic surgery systems in the two-channel force–position control scheme without the direct employment of force sensors at the end-effector of the slave robot. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Ancillary