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Radio Science

Modeling of the perfect electromagnetic conducting boundary in the finite difference time domain method

Authors

  • Vahid Nayyeri,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
    2. School of Electrical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran
    • Corresponding author: V. Nayyeri, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L3G1, Canada. (nayyeri@ieee.org)

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  • Mohammad Soleimani,

    1. School of Electrical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran
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  • Mojtaba Dehmollaian

    1. Center of Excellence on Applied Electromagnetic Systems, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran
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Abstract

[1] The perfect electromagnetic conducting (PEMC) boundary, a nonreciprocal generalization of both perfect electric conducting (PEC) and perfect magnetic conducting (PMC) boundaries, is modeled in the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Since the PEMC boundary condition requires collocation of same components of both electric and magnetic fields at the boundary grids, which is not compatible with the original FDTD algorithm, its implementation in FDTD is challenging and requires modification in the algorithm. To do this task, first, the original FDTD cell is modified by inserting the required field components not present in the original cell. Then, a novel formulation is developed for updating fields' components at the boundary. Modeling of a PEMC planar interface, a corner point, and a wedge point are presented. Finally, numerical examples are presented to show stability, accuracy, and applicability of the proposed approach. Validation is achieved by comparisons with existing analytic methods and/or conventional FDTD for special cases of PEC and PMC boundaries.

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