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Eliciting patient and caregiver perspectives to improve the public reporting of rehabilitation quality measures

Authors

  • Christina Papadimitriou PhD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    • School of Nursing & Health Studies, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois, USA
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  • Susan Magasi PhD,

    1. Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    2. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Holly DeMark MPPA,

    1. Center for Rehabilitation Outcomes Research, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Caitlin Taylor BS,

    1. Center for Rehabilitation Outcomes Research, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Michael S. Wolf PhD, MPH,

    1. Center for Healthcare Studies, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Allen W. Heinemann PhD,

    1. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    2. Center for Healthcare Studies, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    3. Center for Rehabilitation Outcomes Research, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • Anne Deutsch PhD, RN, CRRN

    1. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    2. Center for Healthcare Studies, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA
    3. Center for Rehabilitation Outcomes Research, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA
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  • An earlier version of this report was presented, in part, at the National Association of Rehabilitation Research and Training Centers annual meeting, May 2009, Washington, DC.
  • No commercial party having a direct financial interest in the results of the research supporting this article has conferred or will confer a benefit upon the author(s) or upon any organization with which the author(s) is/are associated.

Correspondence

Christina Papadimitriou, PhD, Northern Illinois University, School of Nursing and Health Studies, 1240 Normal Road, DeKalb, IL.

E-mail: cpapadimitriou@niu.edu

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate patients' and caregivers' abilities to comprehend information on rehabilitation quality measures, and select high-quality rehabilitation facility.

Design

We used exploratory, qualitative study using cognitive interviewing.

Setting

Three Outpatient rehabilitation facilities in metropolitan Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Participants

The study participants included 27 patients or three caregivers, 63% female; 36.7% white, 43.3% African American, 10% Asian, 10% missing/other; health literacy: 59% at the 8th grade level or lower; age range: 33–94.

Main Outcome Measure(s)

Patient and caregiver comprehension of quality measures.

Results

Respondents understood some rehabilitation quality terms, but had difficulty with medical terminology; linking quality measures to hospital quality; explaining choice of “better” quality facility; and reading tables. The research team simplified terminology, definitions, layout, and design; added an introduction to provide a framework for understanding quality.

Conclusions

Quality measure information can be difficult to understand and use. When reporting quality measures, use plain language, avoid medical jargon, follow logically sequenced content, easy-to-read layout, provide framework for understanding quality, and solicit consumer feedback.

Clinical Implications

Not applicable.

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