Choices: Anger and Anger Management in Rehabilitative Care

Authors


Correspondence

Linda L. Pierce, Professor, College of Nursing, University of Toledo, 3000 Arlington Avenue; Mailstop 1026; Toledo, OH 43614. E-mail: l.pierce@utoledo.edu

Abstract

Background and Purpose

Violent acts are on rise and rehabilitation providers as caregivers may encounter anger on a daily basis. The purpose of this article is to discuss anger and describe anger management strategies based on behavioral interventions grounded in Choice Theory.

Choice Theory

Applying choice theory to anger is the belief that people are internally, not externally motivated, and that outside events do not make people do anything. Thus, what drives people's anger behaviors are internally developed notions of what is important and satisfying for them.

Clinical Relevance and Conclusion

Anger becomes a choice along with its management. Choosing strategies to manage anger are key to reducing the potential for angry emotions to escalate to the point of aggressive and violent acts that threaten caregivers and clients safety. Anger-free environments promote mental/physical health and establish elements of safe living and working environments in a variety of rehabilitative care settings.

Ancillary