Torsional and cyclic fatigue resistances of glide path preparation instruments: G-file and PathFile

Authors

  • Sang Yup Sung,

    1. Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Dental Research Institute, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Korea
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  • Jung-Hong Ha,

    1. Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea
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  • Sang-Won Kwak,

    1. Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Dental Research Institute, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Korea
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  • Rashid El Abed,

    1. Department of Dentistry, Endodontic Unit, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE
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  • Kyeongmin Byeon,

    1. Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Dental Research Institute, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Korea
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  • Hyeon-Cheol Kim

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Dental Research Institute, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Korea
    • Address for reprints: Hyeon-Cheol Kim, Department of Conservative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Dental Research Institute, Pusan National University, Beomeo-ri, Mulgeum, Yangsan, Gyeongnam 626-787, Korea.

      E-mail: golddent@pusan.ac.kr

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  • Sang Yup Sung and Jung-Hong Ha contributed equally to this work and have the first authorship shared.
  • Conflict of interest: none.

Summary

This study aimed to compare cyclic fatigue and torsional resistances of glide path creating instruments with different tapers and tip sizes. Two sizes (G1 and G2) from G-File system and three sizes (PathFile #1, #2, and #3) from PathFile system were used for torsional resistance and cyclic fatigue resistance tests (n = 10). The torsional resistance was evaluated at 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-mm from the file tip by plotting the torsional load changes until fracture by rotational loading of 2 rpm. The cyclic fatigue resistance was compared by measuring the number of cycles to failure. Data were analyzed statistically using one-way ANOVA and Duncan's post-hoc comparison. The length of the fractured file fragment was also measured. All fractured fragments were observed under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Although G-2 file showed a lower torsional strength than PathFile #3 at 2- and 3-mm levels (p < 0.05), they had similar ultimate strengths at 4-, 5-, and 6-mm levels (p > 0.05). The smaller files of each brand had a significantly higher cyclic fatigue resistance than the bigger ones (p < 0.05). PathFile #1 and #2 had higher fatigue resistances than G-files (p < 0.05). While G-1 had a similar fatigue resistance as PathFile #3, G-2 showed the lowest and PathFile #1 showed the highest resistances among the tested groups (p < 0.05). The SEM examination showed typical appearances of cyclic fatigue and torsional fractures, regardless of the tested levels. Clinicians may consider the instruments' sizes for each clinical case in order to get efficient glide path with minimal risk of fracture. SCANNING 36:500–506, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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