Highlighting hybridity: A critical discourse analysis of teacher talk in science classrooms

Authors

  • Mary U. Hanrahan

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Innovation in Education, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    • Centre for Innovation in Education, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

  • An earlier version of this paper was presented at the Annual Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education conference, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 28 November–2 December 2002. URL: http://www.aare.edu.au/02pap/han02218.htm

Abstract

There is evidence that alienation from science is linked to the dominant discourse practices of science classrooms (cf. Lemke, J. L. (1990). Talking Science: Language, Learning, and Values. Norwood, NJ: Ablex). Yet, in secondary science education it is particularly hard to find evidence of curriculum reform that includes explicit changes in pedagogic discourses to accommodate the needs of students from a wide range of backgrounds. However, such evidence does exist and needs to be highlighted wherever it is found to help address social justice concerns in science education. In this article, I show how critical discourse analysis can be used to explore a way of challenging the dominant discourse in teacher—student interactions in science classrooms. My findings suggest a new way of moving toward more socially just science curricula in middle years and secondary classrooms by using hybrid discourses that can serve emancipatory purposes. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Sci Ed90:8–43, 2006

Ancillary