SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • American Association for the Advancement of Science. (1989). Science for all Americans. Washington, DC: AAAS.
  • Atwater, M. M., & Riley, J. P. (1993). Multicultural science education: Perspectives, definitions, and research agenda. Science Education, 77, 661668.
  • Bernstein, R. J. (1983). Beyond objectivism and relativism: Science, hermeneutics, and praxis. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
  • Bloom, A. (1987). The closing of the American mind. New York: Simon & Schuster.
  • Brickhouse, N. W. (in press). Bringing in the outsiders: Reshaping the sciences of the future. Journal of Curriculum Studies.
  • Brickhouse, N. W., Stanley, W. B., & Whitson, J. A. (1993). Practical reasoning and science education: Implications for theory and practice. Science & Education, 2, 363375.
  • Brown, H. I. (1977). Perception, theory and commitment: The new philosophy of science. Chicago: Precedent Publishing, Inc.
  • Clewell, B. C., Anderson, B. T., & Thorpe, M. E. (1992). Breaking the barriers: Helping female and minority students succeed in mathematics and science. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  • Dennick, R., (1992). Analyzing multicultural and antiracist science education. School Science Review, 73 (264), 7988.
  • DeVitt, N. (1979). The statistical case for elimination of the midwife: Fact versus prejudice, 1890-1935 (part 2). Women & Health, 4 (2), 169186.
  • Donegan, J. B. (1978). Women & men midwives: Medicine, morality, and misogyny in early America. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
  • Follman, J. (1984). Cornucopia of correlations. American Psycholgist, 39, 701702.
  • Gottfredson, L. S. (1987). The practical significance of black-white differences in intelligence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 10, 510512.
  • Gould, S. J. (1981). The mismeasure of man. New York: W. W. Norton.
  • Haraway, D. (1988). Situated knowledges: The science question in feminism and the privilege of partial perspective. Feminist Studies, 14, 575599.
  • Harding, S. (1986). The science question in feminism. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Harding, S. (1991). Whose science? Whose knowledge. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Haskell, T. L. (1984). The authority of experts: Studies in history and theory. Bloomington, IN: University of Indiana Press.
  • Hirsch, E. D. (1987). Cultural literacy: What every American needs to know. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
  • Hodson, D. (1993). In search of a rationale for multicultural science education. Science Eudcation, 77, 685711.
  • Jacob, M. C. (1988). The cultural meaning of the scientific revolution. New York: Knopf.
  • Jacobson, J. L. (1989). Abandoning homelands. In State of the World 1989. New York: W. W. Norton.
  • Jensen, A. R. (1980). Bias in mental testing. New York: Free Press.
  • Kelly, G. J., Carlsen, W. S., & Cunningham, C. M. (1993). Science education in sociocultural context: Perspectives from the sociology of science. Science Education, 77 (2), 207220.
  • Kuhn, T. (1970). The structure of scientific revolutions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Lakatos, I. (1977). Proofs and refutations. Cambridge: Cambrige University Press.
  • Leavitt, J. W. (1986). Brought to bed: Childbearing in America 1750 to 1950. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Matthews, M. R. (1993, April). Multicultural science education: The contribution of history and philosophy of science. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, Atlanta, GA.
  • Merton, R. K. (1970). Science, technology, and society in seventeenth-century England. New York: Howard Fertig.
  • National Committee for Science Education Standards and Assessment. (1992, October). Discussion document prepared for the AAAS Forum for School Science, October 30-31, 1992.
  • Oakes, J. (1990). Opportunities, achievement, and choice: Women and minority students in science and mathematics. Review of Research in Education, 16, 153222.
  • Popper, K. R. (1968). The logic of scientific discovery. New York: Harper & Row. (Original work published 1935.)
  • Rakow, S. J., & Bermudez, A. B. (1993). Science is “Ciencia”: Meeting the needs of Hispanic American students. Science Education, 77, 669683.
  • Ravitch, D., & Finn, C. E. (1987). What do our 17-year olds know? New York: Harper & Row.
  • Rennie, L. J., & Parker, L. H. (1993). Curriculum reform and choice of science: Consequences for balanced and equitable participation and achievement. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 30, 10171028.
  • Rodney, W. (1982). How Europe underdeveloped Africa. Washington, DC: Howard University Press.
  • Schlesinger, A. M., Jr. (1991). The disuniting of America: Reflections on a multicultural society. Knoxville, TN: Whittle Direct Books.
  • Tew, M. (1990). Safer childbirth? A critical history of maternity care. New York: Chapman & Hall.
  • Upawansa, G. K. (1989). Traditional is appropriate: Ecologically balanced agriculture in Sri Lanka. In Z.Sardar (Ed.), The revenge of Athena: Science, exploitation and the third world. New York: Mansell.
  • Wertz, R. W., & Wertz, D. C. (1977). Lying-in: A history of childbirth in America. New York: Free Press.
  • Wolf, D., Bixby, J., Glenn, J., & Gardner, H. (1991). To use their minds well: Investigating new forms of student assessment. Review of Research in Education, 17, 3174.