Toward a Research Agenda for the Informal Economy: A Survey of the Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal's Editorial Board

Authors

  • David J. Ketchen Jr,

    Corresponding author
    1. Harbert College of Business, Department of Management, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, U.S.A.
    • Correspondence to: David J. Ketchen, Jr., Harbert College of Business, Department of Management, Auburn University, 405 W. Magnolia Ave., Auburn, AL 36849, U.S.A. E-mail: ketchda@auburn.edu

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  • R. Duane Ireland,

    1. Mays Business School, Department of Management, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, U.S.A.
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  • Justin W. Webb

    1. Spears School of Business, Department of Entrepreneurship, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Scholarly attention to strategy and entrepreneurship within the informal economy appears to be on the rise, but a large gap remains between the importance of the informal economy and the amount of research that is devoted to it. The survey reported herein is an effort to offer insights to researchers who wish to help build the knowledge base about strategy and entrepreneurship within the informal economy. Specifically, we surveyed members of the Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal's editorial board regarding what they view as the most promising theories, research questions, and methods to leverage in order to develop greater understanding of the informal economy. Board members' views vary, but in general institutional theory and network theory are seen as the best perspectives to fuel major contributions at this time. The research questions that attracted the strongest support centered on the boundaries of and interchanges between the formal and informal economies. Finally, field interviews, case studies, and ethnography were ranked as the most promising investigative methods. Taken together, these findings offer a possible agenda for research into the informal economy. Copyright © 2014 Strategic Management Society.

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