Surface modification of titanium by using plasma-induced graft-polymerization

Authors

  • Yashao Chen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry (Shaanxi Normal University), Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Xi'an 710062, China
    • Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry (Shaanxi Normal University), Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Xi'an 710062, China.
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  • Yu Sun,

    1. Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry (Shaanxi Normal University), Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Xi'an 710062, China
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  • Baoming Zhao,

    1. Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry (Shaanxi Normal University), Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Xi'an 710062, China
    2. Xi'an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi'an 710065, China
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  • Haiyan Wan,

    1. Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry (Shaanxi Normal University), Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Xi'an 710062, China
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  • Di Wu

    1. Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry (Shaanxi Normal University), Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Xi'an 710062, China
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Abstract

Plasma-induced graft-polymerization (PIGP) method was utilized in this study to improve corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of titanium (Ti) surface. Bioactive molecule polyacrylamide (PAM) was immobilized onto Ti surface by introducing silanederivatized spacer arms as an intermediary for the covalent linkage. Ti was firstly activated by O2 plasma, and oxygen-containing groups were introduced on its surface consequently. The intermediary mercapto silane spacer molecules were then covalently linked to the oxidated surface, followed by the covalent binding of PAM and the sulfhydryl-terminal groups via PIGP. Surface analyses following modification process included water contact angles (CA), SEM, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), XPS and atomic force microscope (AFM). The results revealed the effectiveness of this method on immobilizing PAM to Ti surface, and the hydrophilicity of modified surface improved remarkably. In addition, potentiodynamic polarization and cellular proliferation tests were implemented to validate the enhanced corrosion-resistance and biocompatibility of modified Ti surface, respectively. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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